Love, The Invisible Driving Force in Porphyria’s Lover

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Love is one of the most complicated human emotions. It has driven many individuals to engage in actions that they would otherwise not partake in. Love is the emotion that launched a thousand… Continue reading

The Loss of The Savior in Images – The Goblin Market

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Playboy’s 1973 illustrations of The Goblin Market leaves little imagination room as to what is going on in Christina Rossetti’s poem. The poem is very complex in the ideas it presents. Rossetti’s work… Continue reading

The Lady of Shallot Echoed Throughout Time as seen in Song of the Sparrows

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The Lady of Shallot by Alfred Lord Tennyson is one work that has echoed in literature throughout time. Written and then revised, once in 1832 and again in 1842, the story itself draws… Continue reading

Socioeconomic Slut-Shaming

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Comparing Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “Jenny” to the 90’s rom-com Pretty Woman.

Robert Browning’s Blank Space

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I know. Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” paralleled with Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess?” Believe me, no one understands how absurd this sounds more than I do, but it works, does it not? The… Continue reading

No Country for Young Prostitutes

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When reading Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Jenny, the reader is faced with a dilemma that has plagued humanity for a very long time. How do we implement change in a meaningful way that helps… Continue reading

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass: Fight Club’s Representation of The Strange Case of Dissociative Identity Disorder

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Unfortunately enough for her, Marla Singer said it best: “You’re Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass”. It is in this line that lies the stanch dichotomy of the human mind, perception and consciousness. Long… Continue reading

SENSUALITY IN “GOBLIN MARKET” CHALLENGES VICTORIAN IDEALS

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While read as a children’s story throughout the nineteenth century, it seems impossible to read Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” and not stop and ask yourself what is actually happening between sisters, Laura and… Continue reading

Murder, He Wrote: Robert Browning and Killing the Duchess and Porphyria

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“Robert Browning is one among those who highlights the scenario of killing women for possessive passions and social status. It is found that the two poems of Robert Browning “My Last Duchess” and… Continue reading

The Strange Case of Ben and Glory: Stevenson Re-imagined as a Buffyverse “Big Bad”

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People are relatively easy to please when it concerns entertainment. The sensational topics which Victorian readers devoured and then relived in subsequent publications and theater adaptations are the same topics which today can… Continue reading

Dramatic Monologue: A look into characterization in Porphyria’s Lover

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Porphyria and her lover Robert Browning most well-known style is the dramatic monologue. So well-known that he has been called the father of the dramatic monologue. According to Philip Hobshaum of the Hudson… Continue reading

Untangling the Lady of Shalott

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The story of Rapunzel in the Disney movie Tangled is unlike any story ever told, except, that is, for the story of “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred Lord Tennyson. Although, both of… Continue reading

Imperialism and its Emphasis on a Mother/Child Relationship in “The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point”

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The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point- Elizabeth Barrett Browning “Text” Category Imperialism is present throughout the history of the uprising of the British Empire and the effects it has on the readership and… Continue reading

The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name: Implicit Homosexuality in Robert Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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The Victorian Period in England was marked chiefly by silence. Spending a day in the foggy streets of London, a modern reader might think that no vice existed in the period, no animal… Continue reading

We Need To Talk: Prostitution in Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “Jenny” and J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher In The Rye

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A Comparison of The Catcher In The Rye by J.D. Salinger and “Jenny” by Dante Gabriel Rossetti

Frozen Meets Goblin Market

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Disney’s Frozen took audiences by storm when it hit theaters in 2013. With a quirky snowman, charming love interests, majestic powers, and singing trolls, Disney defied all odds and ventured away from the… Continue reading

I WISH THAT I COULD BE LIKE THE COOL KIDS: HOW THE AGE OF INNOCENCE HAS ALTERED

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Throughout William Blake’s, Songs of Innocence and Experience, he goes to great lengths on both accounts, of showing the true differences between a life of innocence, and how this is altered once experience has come… Continue reading

Gothic and Romanticism: An Analysis of The Supernatural and Sublime In Mary Robinson’s, “The Haunted Beach”

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Seeped in Gothic themes and influences, the murder of a shipwrecked sailor divulges with details in Mary Robinson’s, “The Haunted Beach”. However, explanations surrounding the characters are scarce; the reasoning as to why… Continue reading

Birds aren’t just IFO’s (Identified Flying Objects)

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Originally posted on Documents From Sunny Duncan:
In John Keats’ Ode to a Nightingale, and Percy Shelley’s To A Sky-Lark, both authors use the subject of their poem, a type of bird, to…

CONTINUED CHANGE: SPOTLIGHT ON THE LATE/EARLY 1800 WOMAN

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Mary Wollstonecraft: Context Category Can one voice challenge the thoughts of a crowd and bring hope for change? For one thing, women have been wishing  for rights way past the creation of Wollstonecraft’s… Continue reading

Get Back To Our Roots: Romanticizing Nature and Spirituality in Contemporary Film

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It is often said that the romantic movement never truly ended. In his book The Long and Winding Road from Blake to the Beatles, Matthew Schneider argues that it “is still the prevailing cultural paradigm in… Continue reading

The X-Files “Does” Frankenstein

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The science fiction/crime procedural The X-Files (1993-2002) established itself as not only a popular culture phenomenon but as a staple of “quality television” – series that are fundamentally “high” culture and intelligent. The show boasts three… Continue reading

How Would Radical Thinker and Poet William Blake Think of Walt Disney’s Timeless Classic Mary Poppins? : Has the Image of the Chimney Sweep Changed?

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“Song of Innocence and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul” is considered to be one of William Blake’s most popular works. Written in two parts, “Innocence and Experience… Continue reading

The History of Mary Prince, a tremendous step towards Freedom

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“White people who keep slaves think that black people are like cattle, without natural affection. But my heart tells me it is far otherwise.” It is by her emotional standpoints that Mary Prince… Continue reading

The Scarlet Albatross: The Ancient Mariner’s Own Cross To Bear

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What goes around truly does come back around, and karma tends to come back to us with a vengeance. The world has a mysterious way of making sure people’s wrong-doings are brought to… Continue reading

My Own Private Eden: Blake and Von Trier’s Efforts at a Personal Fall

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William Blake and Lars Von Trier are two artists who’ve made some strong efforts to reshape theological structures to more accurately explain human tendencies than the original stories did. In Songs of Innocence… Continue reading

Slavery: More Than Forced Labor

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Enslavement in Visions of the Daughters of Albion is depicted in William Blake’s progressive text. Oothoon, the female protagonist, is bound by society’s standpoint on purity. She is further bound when raped by… Continue reading

The Sublime and the Beautiful in Marvel’s Daredevil [Spoilers]

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Originally posted on joshpankeyblog:
In the spring, Marvel Studios collaborated with Netflix to create the series Daredevil, based upon the long-running Marvel comic series of the same name. The comics and the series follow…

“The Still, Sad Music of Humanity”: The French Revolution’s Influence on Wordsworth’s “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey

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William Wordsworth’s Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798, usually abbreviated “Tintern Abbey,” was written close to the end… Continue reading

The Idealization of Childhood in Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Moonrise Kingdom

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Many film goers can think of their favorite quotes from a movie. Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom is rife with them. “That’s not a safe altitude (Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson, 2012)..” “I’m going to find a tree to… Continue reading