300 Years of Feminism: Hypocrisy as the Downfall of Misogyny

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When a person hears the names of Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Virginia Woolf they can hardly be separated from the notion of women’s rights. Although two of them lived and died before… Continue reading

Haywood, Fantomina, Sovay, and Babooshka: The Legacy of Disguising Oneself to Gain Information and Experience

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From the time women were able to write for a living, they were more than eager to rewrite the stereotypical women characters that men had been creating. However, authors like Eliza Haywood knew… Continue reading

Roses and Rebellion: Emily Dickinson’s “Blakean” Use of Hymn Poetry

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It’s no secret that Emily Dickinson’s poetry has, over the course of time, become well-known as a lyrical and whimsical representation of hymn-like poetry. From her more popular poems such as “Much Madness… Continue reading

From a Fifth Year — Tintern Abbey and The University of Arkansas

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Five years have passed; five falls, with length Of five long winters! and again I hear These bells, ringing every hour from Old Mains tower… “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Feminism Legacy

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Mary Wollstonecraft left a legacy that impacts feminism today.

Sublime Stench: Burke, Montagu, and “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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In today’s stereotypical relationship, it is considered taboo for couples to pass gas, use the bathroom, or even vomit in front of each other. Jonathan Swift, sarcastic poet and political novelist, writes a… Continue reading

Power to the Pets: Colonization in the Eyes of Swift and Adult Swim

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Some may have heard the tale that every cat wants to destroy their owner, but that they’re just smart enough to know that they don’t have the means and are better off scratching… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Legacy through Public Education

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In Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft makes an argument for an equal education of both women and men. Often celebrated as the first feminist, Wollstonecraft defines the link between a woman’s strength… Continue reading

Eat the Babies! – Satire and Outrage Culture: The Modern Legacy of Swift’s A Modest Proposal

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            Satire as defined by the Oxford dictionary as, “The use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and… Continue reading

The Gothic Sublime Mystery of Twin Peaks

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This sublime scene was captured in the fictional television show, Twin Peaks. The murder of Laura Palmer haunts this small, sleepy town where the residents are full of secrets. Directors Mark Frost and David Lynch designed the show to be mysterious and disturbing, encompassing the sublime aesthetic which was described by Edmund Burke as that which “excite[s] the ideas of pain and danger… or operates in a manner analogous to terror” (37).

More Than a Misanthrope: Johnathan Swift’s Philosophies

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From its onset, Johnathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels has a misanthropic tone. A reader can reason that Swift is a misanthrope and that he holds nothing but hate for humanity. However, “It is true… Continue reading

Good Horse Sense: Swift and the Houyhnhnm

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by Horace T. Palomino In the fourth part of Johnathon Swift’s “Gulliver’s Travels,” we read of Gulliver’s encounter with the Houyhnhnms and the Yahoos. The Houyhnhnms, in Swift’s work, are a race of… Continue reading

THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS: The Legacy Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” Leaves Behind in Martin Brest’s “Scent of a Woman”

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The future is unknown until we create it ourselves. In life we experience a surplus of situations that are out of our control. We do not get to choose which disease takes over… Continue reading

Profuse Masculinity

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I think we can all agree that relationships are hard. We would also probably agree that, within relationships, some habits are healthier than others. Lastly, I am willing to venture we can all… Continue reading

Defend or Die: The Women of Camelot

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“The Lady of Shalott” and “The Defense of Guenevere” are Victorian era poems of the Arthurian tradition that focus on female characters that are negatively affected because their desires cannot be met without… Continue reading

The Strange Silent Film of Dr. Pyckle and Mr. Pryde

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Everyone knows the classic Gothic novel The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert L. Stevenson. However, those who do not dabble in the silent films of the early 1900’s will… Continue reading

Accusing Guenevere

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“The Defence of Guenevere” by William Morris is a poem detailing King Arthur’s wife’s defense against the accusation of adultery by Arthur’s nephew Gauwaine.  Gauwaine, or Gawain, as his name is spelled in… Continue reading

It’s a Goblin’s Goblin’s Goblin’s Market

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As so often seen in the Victorian Age, the idea of the world being a “man’s world” does not come as a surprise when thinking of Victorian literature. However, Christina Rossetti puts forth… Continue reading

American Horror Story’s Tate Langdon: everything Robert Browning dreamed of

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Whether you’ve been an avid watcher of American Horror Story from the beginning or just caught the last season, you know of the series’ (alleged) psychopath Tate Langdon. His shaggy blonde hair, his dark… Continue reading

Talk Murder to Me: True Crime and the Sublime

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Nothing reaches out and chokes the attention of a morbid mind quite like a murder. Gory? All of the details, please. Scandalous? There’s no good crime without a scandal. Unsolved? Even better. Who… Continue reading

Fascination With the Beast Within: Mr Hyde as Venom

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A man accidentally adopts a second personality that is simultaneously a part of him and a completely separate being…

A Byronic Hero Refresher

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George Gordon, Lord Byron wrote memorable and influential heroes in art and literature known as the Byronic hero. In Major British Writers published in 1954, Northrop Frye described the Byronic hero as “the… Continue reading

The Strange Case of Robert Louis Stevenson and Deacon Brodie: Exploring the Inspiration for Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde, is a true psychological thriller, and brilliantly encompasses the idea of Victorian era duality. However, upon delving deep into the inspiration for… Continue reading

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Popular Music

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I first discovered Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner during my senior year in my AP English class (shout out to Marla Dercher). Ever since, the poem kept finding its way back to… Continue reading

Exploring Jonathan Swift’s Motive and Attitude toward Women in “A Lady’s Dressing Room”

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The motive behind Jonathan Swift’s poem, “A Lady’s Dressing Room” has long been debated. Most interpretations, past and present, rely on the belief that Swift, himself, was a misogynist, and for good reason.… Continue reading

18th Century Rape Vs. 21st Century Rape: There is No Winner

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‘Rape’ has become a common word in everyday vernacular here in the 21st century. While this is upsetting and not a lighthearted subject to breach, it should’ve been a more spoken term before… Continue reading

The Critique of Moral Law in Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience

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In William Blake’s poetry collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, he examines the ways in which people relate and interpret the world around them. He stresses two perspectives: innocence and experience. These perspectives are… Continue reading

Blake’s Criticism of the Establishment in Industrial England in “The Chimney Sweeper”

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William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience explores the relationship between experience and a lack thereof. This notion does not operate linearly– it’s fluid and malleable. For example, regardless of age, one could be innocent… Continue reading

Oroonoko: The Politics That Influenced The Royal Slave

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Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko is one of the more famous pieces to come from the restoration period, and its popularity comes from the main character’s nobleness as a slave. Although the work presents itself… Continue reading

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

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