Author Archive

Haggard: Exploring the Lost World

by

What do Jurassic Park and Indiana Jones have to do with writer H. Rider Haggard? All of these pop culture darlings have Haggard to thank for popularizing the Lost World genre. Haggard’s formula… Continue reading

Science And Fiction: Penetrating the Recesses of Nature

by

When reading Mary Shelley’s first novel, Frankenstein, from a standpoint steeped in advanced scientific technology, modern day readers find it easy to scoff at Victor Frankenstein’s ill-advised scheme of reanimation. However, the popular… Continue reading

The Masque of Anarchy Vs. Passive Resistance

by

The work of Percy Shelley was a powerful springboard for the principle of passive resistance, both at its publication in the midst of major political upheaval and during modern day conflicts. One of… Continue reading

Williams’ Radical Journalism

by

While Helen Maria Williams is mainly heralded as a “pre-eminent among the violent female devotees of the revolution,” not only because of her unwavering written support for the radical faction of the French… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: The Oxymoronic Feminist

by

The writings of Mary Wollstonecraft forecasted a bright future for women in which the “cultivation of the understanding” is superior to “the acquirement of some corporeal accomplishment” (Wollstonecraft 313).  Modern feminists appreciate her… Continue reading

Alone On Humdrum Island

by

          During an age where the most scandalous thing you could do to your family was to leave them and pursue your dreams of being a bonified seafarer, Daniel… Continue reading

  • Follow British Literature 1700-1900, A Course Blog on WordPress.com