Category Archive: Author

More Than a Misanthrope: Johnathan Swift’s Philosophies

by

From its onset, Johnathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels has a misanthropic tone. A reader can reason that Swift is a misanthrope and that he holds nothing but hate for humanity. However, “It is true… Continue reading

It’s a Goblin’s Goblin’s Goblin’s Market

by

As so often seen in the Victorian Age, the idea of the world being a “man’s world” does not come as a surprise when thinking of Victorian literature. However, Christina Rossetti puts forth… Continue reading

The Sublimity of Artificial Intelligence in Netflix’s “Black Mirror”

by

            Edmund Burke defined the Sublime as anything that terrifies and astonishes us, particularly whatever is vast, ambiguously defined, or extremely powerful. In his view, a subjects’ ability to strike fear in the… Continue reading

It’s Not You, It’s God: Christina Rossetti’s Relationship with Religion and Its Subsequent Role in her Poetry

by

I. INTRODUCTION Setting: 20th century Mont-Blanc retreat. Four reincarnated Romantic and Victorian poets are climbing the summit of the mountain, talking amongst themselves. Elizabeth Barrett (Not-Yet) Browning: So, like, this guy keeps sending… Continue reading

Artists’ Depictions of the Many Faces of Mr. Hyde

by

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde creates a literary space, where puzzled readers take on the challenge of assigning signifiers to the mysterious nature of Hyde and interpreting the distinctive rhetorical sublime… Continue reading

Lord Byron: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

by

  The Byronic hero is commonly described as arrogant and isolated, while also being seductive and mysterious. Part of the character’s mystery is usually due to their hidden, dark past. Our modern Byronic… Continue reading

ODE: INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY AND NATALIE WOOD

by

“Well when we’re young we look at things very idealistically, I guess, and I think Wordsworth means when we grow up that we have to forget the ideals of youth.” –Deanie Loomis. My… Continue reading

The Subliminally Haunted Beach

by

When thinking about the Romantic period, some incorrectly think of love and happily ever after in stories and poetry. Even though writers did focus on those specific themes, they were also heavily focused… Continue reading

The Tragic Lives of Oroonoko and Julius Caesar

by

In the story of Oroonoko, Oroonoko, an African prince, is forced to face many trials and tribulations. Eventually he is given the name “Caesar”, and although this may seem like a small detail,… Continue reading

The History of Mary Prince, a tremendous step towards Freedom

by

“White people who keep slaves think that black people are like cattle, without natural affection. But my heart tells me it is far otherwise.” It is by her emotional standpoints that Mary Prince… Continue reading

The Reasons that Required Lady Montagu to write a Poem criticizing Dr. S.

by

18th century society in England mandated a chasm as wide as the Atlantic Ocean between the roles of the sexes. The men supposed themselves England: superior, imperial, and conquering, while giving the women… Continue reading

Charles Dickens and the Industrial Landscape.

by

Charles Dickens was a powerfully sympathetic force in the Victorian Era towards the suffering Middle Class. He believed that misplaced ideals had lead the upper-middle class to pursue riches and delicacies while totally… Continue reading

Promethean Sin

by

Lord Byron, arguably one of the greatest writers of the Romantic period, gave literature himself. Not his actual work, but rather his personality, his actual self. Not to say that his work is… Continue reading

Empathy and the Economy

by

A recent scientific study has found empirical evidence that reading literary fiction makes a person more empathic. But this seems to have been the general consensus with writers and lovers of literature for… Continue reading

Religious Metaphor in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by

Samuel Taylor Coleridge, assisted by several other philosophers and writers of the time, helped to propel England into the Romantic Movement in the late eighteenth century. The movement marked England’s developmental shift out… Continue reading

H. Rider Haggard, Author of She

by

H. Rider Haggard became one of the most popular fiction novelists of his time. At the peak of his career, he was writing two to three novels a year. Despite his late start,… Continue reading

Haggard’s Adventures in South Africa

by

An author’s works are always made more stimulating and enjoyable if the author is able to draw from personal experiences to bring characters and stories to life. H. Rider Haggard does this with… Continue reading

The Impact of Life on a Work

by

Writers are a funny bunch of people. They’re world creators, taking bits and pieces from many places, and combining them in completely new ways. But the biggest things authors utilize are their own… Continue reading

Mary Kingsley and Femal Agency

by

After the deaths of her parents in 1892, Mary Kingsley, who by this time was already thirty and, by British standards at the time, an old maid, could not have possibly imagined all… Continue reading

An Unmannerly Crocodile and a Victorian “Lady”

by

When Mary Kingsley escaped the “stay-at-home daughter” role she had performed the first thirty years of her life, she had no idea it would be crocodiles and savages that would raise her position… Continue reading

How Frances Got Her Groove Back

by

Upon reading Domestic Manners of the Americans by Frances Trollope, the readers are introduced to a woman named Frances who expects to find American society similar to that of England. As she describes… Continue reading

Charles Dickens, Time Traveler and Ghostbuster

by

The Doctor, Rose Tyler, and on the far right, Charles Dickens attending a seance to communicate with the “ghosts.” At the end of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, there is a bit of… Continue reading

Christina Rossetti: Lizzie becomes Laura

by

            Often, it is said, “life imitates art.” In many ways, some by design and others mere happenstance, the reverse applies to the life of Christina Rossetti and her… Continue reading

Stevenson’s Critique of Social Construction

by

After researching Robert Louis Stevenson’s early life, I have developed thoughts regarding his piece, The Curious Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. As a high school student I read this text and… Continue reading

Educating an Author

by

The beauty of reading a work of great influence goes beyond the beauty of the text; it can also give us insight into the writer. Through reading Frankenstein we get a look at the… Continue reading

Lord Byron as the Byronic Template

by

Lord Byron had a tenuous pauper to prince upbringing, and gradually became a self-made man. The title he inherited from his great uncle helped him in this endeavor, while his abandonment by his… Continue reading

Mad, Bad, Dangerous and Byronic

by

Upon meeting George Gordon Byron, Lady Caroline Lamb famously called him “mad, bad, and dangerous to know.”  And even though the end of their affair drove her to madness and obsession, Lady Lamb… Continue reading

John Keats’ Representation in the Romantics

by

John Keats was an impactful player in the Romantic literary movement. Though he may seem in the shadows of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelly, and Byron, he is noted with the group for a reason:… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: Influence Beyond the Grave

by

        Mary Wollstonecraft’s life was a life filled with literary and personal discoveries, and regardless of a slight smearing of her character upon her death, her works have influenced an… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

by

One of the most famous novels ever published (Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus) was written by the time its author, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, turned 19. 

  • Follow British Literature 1700-1900, A Course Blog on WordPress.com