Category Archive: Legacy/Impact

Jekyll and Hyde Adaptations: in a League of Their Own

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886), sought to confront the social norms of the Victorian Period by infusing realism into Gothic tropes. No longer were characters… Continue reading

300 Years of Feminism: Hypocrisy as the Downfall of Misogyny

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When a person hears the names of Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Virginia Woolf they can hardly be separated from the notion of women’s rights. Although two of them lived and died before… Continue reading

Roses and Rebellion: Emily Dickinson’s “Blakean” Use of Hymn Poetry

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It’s no secret that Emily Dickinson’s poetry has, over the course of time, become well-known as a lyrical and whimsical representation of hymn-like poetry. From her more popular poems such as “Much Madness… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Feminism Legacy

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Mary Wollstonecraft left a legacy that impacts feminism today.

Power to the Pets: Colonization in the Eyes of Swift and Adult Swim

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Some may have heard the tale that every cat wants to destroy their owner, but that they’re just smart enough to know that they don’t have the means and are better off scratching… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Legacy through Public Education

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In Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft makes an argument for an equal education of both women and men. Often celebrated as the first feminist, Wollstonecraft defines the link between a woman’s strength… Continue reading

Eat the Babies! – Satire and Outrage Culture: The Modern Legacy of Swift’s A Modest Proposal

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            Satire as defined by the Oxford dictionary as, “The use of humour, irony, exaggeration, or ridicule to expose and criticize people’s stupidity or vices, particularly in the context of contemporary politics and… Continue reading

The Gothic Sublime Mystery of Twin Peaks

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This sublime scene was captured in the fictional television show, Twin Peaks. The murder of Laura Palmer haunts this small, sleepy town where the residents are full of secrets. Directors Mark Frost and David Lynch designed the show to be mysterious and disturbing, encompassing the sublime aesthetic which was described by Edmund Burke as that which “excite[s] the ideas of pain and danger… or operates in a manner analogous to terror” (37).

The Strange Silent Film of Dr. Pyckle and Mr. Pryde

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Everyone knows the classic Gothic novel The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert L. Stevenson. However, those who do not dabble in the silent films of the early 1900’s will… Continue reading

American Horror Story’s Tate Langdon: everything Robert Browning dreamed of

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Whether you’ve been an avid watcher of American Horror Story from the beginning or just caught the last season, you know of the series’ (alleged) psychopath Tate Langdon. His shaggy blonde hair, his dark… Continue reading

Fascination With the Beast Within: Mr Hyde as Venom

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A man accidentally adopts a second personality that is simultaneously a part of him and a completely separate being…

18th Century Rape Vs. 21st Century Rape: There is No Winner

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‘Rape’ has become a common word in everyday vernacular here in the 21st century. While this is upsetting and not a lighthearted subject to breach, it should’ve been a more spoken term before… Continue reading

The Sublimity of Artificial Intelligence in Netflix’s “Black Mirror”

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            Edmund Burke defined the Sublime as anything that terrifies and astonishes us, particularly whatever is vast, ambiguously defined, or extremely powerful. In his view, a subjects’ ability to strike fear in the… Continue reading

Artists’ Depictions of the Many Faces of Mr. Hyde

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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde creates a literary space, where puzzled readers take on the challenge of assigning signifiers to the mysterious nature of Hyde and interpreting the distinctive rhetorical sublime… Continue reading

Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market” & The Limits We Are Willing To Go.

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Goblin Market is a narrative poem, penned by Christina Rossetti in 1862 (Damrosch & Dettmar, pg. 1643). This particular piece is considered to be her greatest work by many, and it has best… Continue reading

Remembering Belinda

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This meme is in reference to “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope and used V for Vendetta to illustrate the importance and huge impact The Baron created by cutting off a… Continue reading

ODE: INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY AND NATALIE WOOD

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“Well when we’re young we look at things very idealistically, I guess, and I think Wordsworth means when we grow up that we have to forget the ideals of youth.” –Deanie Loomis. My… Continue reading

Beauty and The Blake: The Message Behind The Roses

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Upon reading William Blake’s “The Sick Rose,” taken from his Songs of Innocence and of Experience, a seemingly unlikely but very applicable comparison quickly came to mind. Be it the current publicized hype… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: Guest of Honor at Galentine’s Day Dinner

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Mary Wollstonecraft should be Leslie Knope’s guest of honor at next year’s Galentine’s Day dinner. Leslie Knope needs a framed portrait of Wollstonecraft on her wall of inspirational women. If they were to… Continue reading

Satire: From Swift to Southpark

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A look into the similarities of satirical responses to national problems from Swift and South Park.

Her Body, His Choice: Rape Culture and 18th Century Literature

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It is a woman’s body, so it should be her choice as to what happens to it, right? Well historically, this has not been the case. This is not a new occurrence, as… Continue reading

The Loss of The Savior in Images – The Goblin Market

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Playboy’s 1973 illustrations of The Goblin Market leaves little imagination room as to what is going on in Christina Rossetti’s poem. The poem is very complex in the ideas it presents. Rossetti’s work… Continue reading

The Lady of Shallot Echoed Throughout Time as seen in Song of the Sparrows

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The Lady of Shallot by Alfred Lord Tennyson is one work that has echoed in literature throughout time. Written and then revised, once in 1832 and again in 1842, the story itself draws… Continue reading

Socioeconomic Slut-Shaming

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Comparing Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “Jenny” to the 90’s rom-com Pretty Woman.

Robert Browning’s Blank Space

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I know. Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” paralleled with Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess?” Believe me, no one understands how absurd this sounds more than I do, but it works, does it not? The… Continue reading

The Strange Case of Ben and Glory: Stevenson Re-imagined as a Buffyverse “Big Bad”

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People are relatively easy to please when it concerns entertainment. The sensational topics which Victorian readers devoured and then relived in subsequent publications and theater adaptations are the same topics which today can… Continue reading

Untangling the Lady of Shalott

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The story of Rapunzel in the Disney movie Tangled is unlike any story ever told, except, that is, for the story of “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred Lord Tennyson. Although, both of… Continue reading

Frozen Meets Goblin Market

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Disney’s Frozen took audiences by storm when it hit theaters in 2013. With a quirky snowman, charming love interests, majestic powers, and singing trolls, Disney defied all odds and ventured away from the… Continue reading

The X-Files “Does” Frankenstein

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The science fiction/crime procedural The X-Files (1993-2002) established itself as not only a popular culture phenomenon but as a staple of “quality television” – series that are fundamentally “high” culture and intelligent. The show boasts three… Continue reading

How Would Radical Thinker and Poet William Blake Think of Walt Disney’s Timeless Classic Mary Poppins? : Has the Image of the Chimney Sweep Changed?

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“Song of Innocence and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul” is considered to be one of William Blake’s most popular works. Written in two parts, “Innocence and Experience… Continue reading

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