Category Archive: Text

Blake’s Depiction of How Innocence and Experience Are Interconnected Through “Infant Sorrow”

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William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience explores the interconnection of innocence and lack thereof, known as experience. As society is known to believe, childhood is a time of innocence before understanding the… Continue reading

An Exploration of Guilt and Penance in Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Culpability and wrongdoing are often used motifs in poem and prose. Guilt and penance used in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner as not only a plot device but a window into the human psyche of… Continue reading

Duality: Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde- A ‘Fine Line’ Doesn’t Exist

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Humans have been debating and fighting over what is considered good and what is evil since before the early ages. In the early ages though, good was determined by religion and anything or… Continue reading

It’s a Man’s World…and Jenny’s Just Sleeping in it

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The nineteenth century was a time of high class division, suppression, and overall judgement. Men and women were held to completely different standards and moral codes. Dante Rossetti’s poem, Jenny, is a great illustration of… Continue reading

Sublime Stench: Burke, Montagu, and “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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In today’s stereotypical relationship, it is considered taboo for couples to pass gas, use the bathroom, or even vomit in front of each other. Jonathan Swift, sarcastic poet and political novelist, writes a… Continue reading

Profuse Masculinity

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I think we can all agree that relationships are hard. We would also probably agree that, within relationships, some habits are healthier than others. Lastly, I am willing to venture we can all… Continue reading

Defend or Die: The Women of Camelot

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“The Lady of Shalott” and “The Defense of Guenevere” are Victorian era poems of the Arthurian tradition that focus on female characters that are negatively affected because their desires cannot be met without… Continue reading

It’s a Goblin’s Goblin’s Goblin’s Market

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As so often seen in the Victorian Age, the idea of the world being a “man’s world” does not come as a surprise when thinking of Victorian literature. However, Christina Rossetti puts forth… Continue reading

The Sublimity of Artificial Intelligence in Netflix’s “Black Mirror”

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            Edmund Burke defined the Sublime as anything that terrifies and astonishes us, particularly whatever is vast, ambiguously defined, or extremely powerful. In his view, a subjects’ ability to strike fear in the… Continue reading

William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper”: Utilizing Poetry to Expose Moral and Religious Tensions

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A series of diverse, politically-charged poems, William Blake’s “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience,” evoke numerous thoughts and convictions in his audience, primarily exploring how a state of mind can influence perception… Continue reading

Textual Analysis of Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market”

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Christina Rossetti’s Victorian-era poem, “Goblin Market”, is mired in allegorical representations of biblical proportions. Specifically, allusions to Eve’s temptation in the Garden of Eden in the book of Genesis as well as Christ’s… Continue reading

Exhibitions of Power in ‘My Last Duchess’

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“That’s my last duchess painted on the wall, Looking as if she were alive” (Browning 1-2) The Duke of Ferrara is the singularly compelling character in Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess,” not only… Continue reading

The Beauty and The Psychopath

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 Robert Browning, recognized for his dramatic monologues poems. Porphyria’s Lover is one of his well-known poems of this style. It is a dark monologue of an unknown speaker who murder’s his lover so… Continue reading

“Eat me, drink me, love me”: An Analysis of Masculinity, Spirituality, and Sexuality in “The Goblin Market”

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The popular image of forbidden fruit, stemming from the story of Adam and Eve in the book of Genesis, has become salient in numerous forms of media. Some of the most well-known renditions… Continue reading

Duality and Denying Our Primal Nature in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of the the Victorian period’s most prominent novellas, notable for it’s early interest in the duality of human nature, a… Continue reading

Artists’ Depictions of the Many Faces of Mr. Hyde

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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde creates a literary space, where puzzled readers take on the challenge of assigning signifiers to the mysterious nature of Hyde and interpreting the distinctive rhetorical sublime… Continue reading

The Rossetti’s Forbidden Desires

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  Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” exposes the ideas and looks placed on women while also combining shocking concepts for that time.  Within the poem the reader will clearly see the sexual tones being used… Continue reading

The Origins of Happiness: Examining the Memory of Birth in Infant Joy and Infant Sorrow

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Of the paired poems in William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, nearly every pair seems to progress from innocence to experience. There is an inherent sense of loss about them that… Continue reading

AN IVY LEAGUE BRUTE: THE IMPORTANCE OF LANGUAGE IN FRANKENSTEIN

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When most people hear “Frankenstein”, they think of a grunting, green, stitched-up mess of a man. As it turns out, the original author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, would have a few qualms with… Continue reading

The Subliminally Haunted Beach

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When thinking about the Romantic period, some incorrectly think of love and happily ever after in stories and poetry. Even though writers did focus on those specific themes, they were also heavily focused… Continue reading

Perspective and Perception, Everything Changes

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In this picture, two people are looking at the same thing but from different perspectives. Because they are seeing it differently, they are also perceiving it differently. (Kate.)

William Wordsworth: Personal Awakening Through the Use of Memory

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Tintern Abbey from a distance With the beginning of a new style of individual experiences and emotions we, as readers, see the shift of focus while studying the works from the years that came before us.  Moving… Continue reading

Make France Great Again: Burke, The French Revolution, and Conservatism

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[Text] In today’s political landscape, the definition of conservatism has been corrupted by many people. Conservatism is often equated with the Republican Party, but this is not the case. The idea of conservatism… Continue reading

Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room” and the Cosmetic Conspiracy

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The Lady’s Dressing Room Jonathan Swift’s 1730 scatological poem “The Lady’s Dressing Room” details the many horrors and humors a man discovers when he decides to sneak into his lover’s room. Composed during… Continue reading

Love, The Invisible Driving Force in Porphyria’s Lover

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Love is one of the most complicated human emotions. It has driven many individuals to engage in actions that they would otherwise not partake in. Love is the emotion that launched a thousand… Continue reading

SENSUALITY IN “GOBLIN MARKET” CHALLENGES VICTORIAN IDEALS

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While read as a children’s story throughout the nineteenth century, it seems impossible to read Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” and not stop and ask yourself what is actually happening between sisters, Laura and… Continue reading

Murder, He Wrote: Robert Browning and Killing the Duchess and Porphyria

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“Robert Browning is one among those who highlights the scenario of killing women for possessive passions and social status. It is found that the two poems of Robert Browning “My Last Duchess” and… Continue reading

Dramatic Monologue: A look into characterization in Porphyria’s Lover

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Porphyria and her lover Robert Browning most well-known style is the dramatic monologue. So well-known that he has been called the father of the dramatic monologue. According to Philip Hobshaum of the Hudson… Continue reading

Imperialism and its Emphasis on a Mother/Child Relationship in “The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point”

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The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point- Elizabeth Barrett Browning “Text” Category Imperialism is present throughout the history of the uprising of the British Empire and the effects it has on the readership and… Continue reading

The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name: Implicit Homosexuality in Robert Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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The Victorian Period in England was marked chiefly by silence. Spending a day in the foggy streets of London, a modern reader might think that no vice existed in the period, no animal… Continue reading

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