Category Archive: Uncategorized

Seeing Strange: A Take on The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Originally posted on Cat's Blog:
  In the days where fiction and fantasy were making a new home for themselves in the minds and imaginations of people across Western Europe, Robert Louis…

Henry Selick- Tim Burton= Coraline

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When analyzing Tim Burton’s movies/filmography, the idea of the sublime is very present and precise in the relationship of his work. Ranging from The Corpse Bride to Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of… Continue reading

Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Toni Morrison’s Subliminal take on Motherhood in Slavery

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Many of the topics and themes explored by writers during the Victorian Period are still very relevant in today’s society, which is not surprising considering that many of the writers during this time… Continue reading

The Duality of Innocence and Experience in William Blake’s “The Tyger”

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As a poem, William Blake’s “The Tyger” functions much the same way that the rest of Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience does; teetering on the precipice of duality in not only… Continue reading

The Fallen Woman and the Virginal Angel: Challenging gender constraints in Goblin Market

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In consequence of the poem’s overwhelming sensual imagery combined with biblical allusions, Christina Rossetti’s Goblin Market, which describes the plight of sisters Laura and Lizzie after they are tempted by the fruit of… Continue reading

Haywood, Fantomina, Sovay, and Babooshka: The Legacy of Disguising Oneself to Gain Information and Experience

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From the time women were able to write for a living, they were more than eager to rewrite the stereotypical women characters that men had been creating. However, authors like Eliza Haywood knew… Continue reading

From a Fifth Year — Tintern Abbey and The University of Arkansas

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Five years have passed; five falls, with length Of five long winters! and again I hear These bells, ringing every hour from Old Mains tower… “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,… Continue reading

THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS: The Legacy Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” Leaves Behind in Martin Brest’s “Scent of a Woman”

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The future is unknown until we create it ourselves. In life we experience a surplus of situations that are out of our control. We do not get to choose which disease takes over… Continue reading

Talk Murder to Me: True Crime and the Sublime

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Nothing reaches out and chokes the attention of a morbid mind quite like a murder. Gory? All of the details, please. Scandalous? There’s no good crime without a scandal. Unsolved? Even better. Who… Continue reading

A Byronic Hero Refresher

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George Gordon, Lord Byron wrote memorable and influential heroes in art and literature known as the Byronic hero. In Major British Writers published in 1954, Northrop Frye described the Byronic hero as “the… Continue reading

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Popular Music

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I first discovered Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner during my senior year in my AP English class (shout out to Marla Dercher). Ever since, the poem kept finding its way back to… Continue reading

The Critique of Moral Law in Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience

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In William Blake’s poetry collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, he examines the ways in which people relate and interpret the world around them. He stresses two perspectives: innocence and experience. These perspectives are… Continue reading

Blake’s Criticism of the Establishment in Industrial England in “The Chimney Sweeper”

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William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience explores the relationship between experience and a lack thereof. This notion does not operate linearly– it’s fluid and malleable. For example, regardless of age, one could be innocent… Continue reading

Oroonoko: The Politics That Influenced The Royal Slave

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Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko is one of the more famous pieces to come from the restoration period, and its popularity comes from the main character’s nobleness as a slave. Although the work presents itself… Continue reading

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

Fantomina: A Desire for a Liberated Life within a Confined One

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          Through the development of the setting, paradox, and parallelism within “Fantomina, Or, Love in a Maze,” Eliza Haywood is able to point up the underlying desire within all… Continue reading

New Creations: Frankenstein Adaptations in Dance

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Frankenstein is a novel by Mary Shelley which has entered nearly every sphere of modern art. The novel has inspired plays, movies, sculptures, TV shows, and paintings. While its most famous iterations are… Continue reading

The Meme Market

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This meme was created from Goblin Market, a story where a group of goblins offer a girl delicious fruits for a lock of her hair and one of her tears. After some time… Continue reading

Arthur Young on the French Revolution

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Arthur Young was originally a supporter of the French Revolution and advocated for similar changes in England. After he saw the horrific violence caused by the revolution he publicly changed his opinion on… Continue reading

Fantomina, the Master of Disguise

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This meme is based on Fantomina; or, Love in a Maze. A novella of a high-born woman, who conducts a social experiment on how a man interacts with different women. Fantomina creates four different… Continue reading

Goblin Market Meme

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I created this meme because one of the main themes throughout Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti was dissatisfaction. Once a girl has tasted the fruit offered by the Goblins, they can no longer hear… Continue reading

STEVENSON SAYS ‘TAKE OFF THE MASKS’

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Could our fast-paced, approval-seeking generation use some advice from Robert Louis Stevenson about authenticity? In an age bent towards social perfection and fueled by the sounds of applause, we are quick to highlight… Continue reading

Rime of the Ancient Mariner Meme

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This meme is based on “Rime of the Ancient Mariner” by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. I was inspired by the mariner’s encounter with the random wedding guest that he bombarded with his tale of… Continue reading

The Lady’s Dressing Room MEME

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This meme represents Strephon’s lack of knowledge toward women. In Jonathon Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room”, Strephon goes into Celia’s dressing room and finds out how filthy and stinky her chamber is. He… Continue reading

Meme: Grumpy Cat Really Gets the Grumpy Monk

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Playing off of “Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister,” this grumpy cat meme does its best to channel the hateful spirit of the narrating monk. This particular meme was inspired by the first stanza,… Continue reading

SCROOGE MEME

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I imagine the expressions of Fred’s party guests to look something like this at seeing Scrooge at the Christmas gathering; and not only that, the once embittered old man looks happy to be… Continue reading

Jekyll and Hyde “Split” meme

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This meme comes from the movie Split, in which the main character Kevin is affected with Dissociative Identity Disorder, possessing multiple personalities. Typically, this meme shows Kevin’s reaction to something negative he did with… Continue reading

Fantomina Meme

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This meme is for the story “Fantomina” by Eliza Haywood. This meme, named “Hurt Bae,” was originally taken from a viral video that revolved around a couple discussing the downfall of their relationship,… Continue reading

The Lady’s Dressing Room Meme

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Jonathan Swift’s “A Lady’s Dressing Room” is a satirical poem about the representation versus actuality of females in 18th century Britain. This meme explains Strephon’s confusion with the discovery of female bodily functions… Continue reading

Manfred’s Meme

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This picture illustrates a moment from Act 1 Scene 2 of Manfred.  It depicts him standing on the Jungfrau, a mountain in the alps near Manfred’s castle.  In this scene, Manfred is debating suicide.… Continue reading

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