Coleridge and Byron

by

After it publishing in the 1800’s Samuel Coleridge’s gothic tale of a young woman and her night with a mysterious marked lady, became wildly popular. This poem contained imagery and language that some… Continue reading

Gothic Before Weird

by

Do you enjoy the works of China Mieville? What about H.P. Lovecraft? Both of these great authors along with many more have written great stories of dark fiction. As the genre of fiction… Continue reading

Gothic Literature Context and Distinctions

by

The term “Gothic” normally conjures popular, oftentimes cliché images in one’s mind, namely: the supernatural, darkness, castles, love, or mystery. However, recent scholarship has begun to separate Gothic literature into two distinct, gender-based… Continue reading

Eccentrics of Blake

by

          While poetry covers an array of topics one author stands alone, William Blake. He wrote about many different things during his life. Blake was known well in some circles during his life,… Continue reading

Mary Prince: From a Female Perspective

by

Published in 1831, when slavery was still heavily practiced in the West Indies, “The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave,” written by Prince herself, painted a never before seen picture of… Continue reading

Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained

by

Sarah Roberts 10/25/13 Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained In reading, “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,” by Wordsworth, I can’t help but think of Keats and Coleridge.  Both writers wrote about a… Continue reading

The Chimney Sweep and Nature’s Children

by

In examining Wordsworth’s Ode on Intimations of Immortality from Early Childhood, there are some similar themes and elements that can also be found in Blake’s collection – specifically when looking at the Chimney… Continue reading

The Masque of Anarchy Vs. Passive Resistance

by

The work of Percy Shelley was a powerful springboard for the principle of passive resistance, both at its publication in the midst of major political upheaval and during modern day conflicts. One of… Continue reading

Wollstonecraft, Revolution, and Human Casualty

by

In November of 1790, political writer Edmund Burke published Reflections on the Revolution in France, lamenting the overturning of the French monarchy, sympathizing with the king and queen and speculating on the negative… Continue reading

Reflections In A Dusty Mirror

by

It has been said that the road to hell is paved with good intentions. In Edmund Burke’s case, it would seem good intentions pave what is an otherwise unstable argument.  In Reflection on… Continue reading

Reflections through the eyes of the unknown

by

Wordsworth’s poem, “written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,” produces a beautiful insight to the sublime and questions our state of being through the presentation of the text.  This poem, composed with a… Continue reading

The Groundbreaking Mary Prince

by

“All slaves want to be free, to be free is sweet…I can tell by myself what other slaves fell, and by what they have told me.  The man that says slaves be quite… Continue reading

William Blake, Chimney Sweeping the Church.

by

   William Blake throughout his life was a man of religious beliefs. However being reverent of the Bible he was hostile to the Church of England and to all forms of organized religion.… Continue reading

Death and the Sublime in “Tintern Abbey”

by

Keats famously called Wordsworth’s approach to nature and the sublime egotistical. Indeed, most Wordsworthian poems are chiefly concerned with his metacognition — memory, personal loss, and nature are filtered through Wordsworth’s self-concept. But… Continue reading

Innocence and Hypocrisy: Just Another Day at Church

by

Though William Blake was a religious man who believed he experienced visions throughout his life, he was not averse to critiquing the “social evils” he perceived within the church (Damrosch 171).  In two… Continue reading

Wordsworth’s Ode: Pre-Existence and Childhood

by

In William Wordsworth’s Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood, the speaker equates the experience of a being a young child with the existence of nature itself. By moving from pre-existent… Continue reading

The Tyger and the Mentalist

by

When a work survives the ages and becomes an often recited and much studied piece of literature, it is taken and used in many different ways than originally intended. It could have the… Continue reading

Not Ceasing From Mental Fight — William Blake’s Mystic Vision

by

William Blake’s strange collection of poetry and polemic is a striking juxtaposition of form and function. Many of his poems, seen on their own, appear much like the didactic and socially-minded religious pop-poetry… Continue reading

Soot -Oh, Sweep

by

When one thinks of a Chimney Sweeper, the first image to come to mind is the romanticized character of Bert the Chimney Sweep from Mary Poppins, the happy-go-lucky figure who always had a… Continue reading

Nature as Beautiful and Sublime in Wordsworth

by

The theme of many of William Wordsworth’s most famous works is a return to nature. Nature, as he describes it, has qualities both beautiful, inspiring love and passion, and sublime, inspiring terror and… Continue reading

Dehumanizing the Dehumanizer

by

In his poem The Negro’s Complaint William Cowper explores the dehumanizing effects of slavery and the slave trade not only on the slave but also on the slaveholder. Cowper shifts the perspective in… Continue reading

(I hope) Some Benevolent Perspective

by

Clearly, from our vantage point we can look at any version of a slave narrative and be quick to condemn the events within it.  Grand moral proclamations are simple in hindsight because we,… Continue reading

African Participation in the Atlantic Slave Trade

by

The opening of  “The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano,” there is a short part in the beginning that opens a door to a part of the slave trade not talked… Continue reading

Allegedly Olaudah: The Origin of Equiano

by

Upon its publication in 1789, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano dramatically altered society’s outlook on race relations, the slave trade, and the abolitionist movement. Fueled by Equiano’s firsthand accounts… Continue reading

Am I Not a Woman and a Sister? The Story of Mary Prince

by

Standing on the shoulders of the famous ex-slave Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, a Bermuda-born slave who lived from 1788 until 1833, was a woman of many firsts (Simkin). Prince was the first woman… Continue reading

The Not So Benevolent Masters

by

“Sometimes farces such as ‘The Benevolent Planters’…can be just as, if not more effective, than a straightforward and truthful, although less imaginative work” (“Abolition” 1).  Published in 1789, Thomas Bellamy’s The Benevolent Planters… Continue reading

New Meaning of the word Benevolent

by

Being taken to a brand new exciting place, meeting new people maybe even a new love, and learning new activities one has never heard of, sounds enticing and alluring, but the harsh reality… Continue reading

Yamba’s Appeal to the British People

by

The Sorrows of Yamba by Hannah More and Eaglesfield Smith calls for the abrogation of Slavery within Britain and its colonies by not only giving an account of the atrocities dealt to the… Continue reading

Olaudah Equiano, the First of Many.

by

Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vassa, was a former slave who lived from around 1745 to 1797. His work is still extremely influential today as he left his footprint in literature as… Continue reading

Williams’ Radical Journalism

by

While Helen Maria Williams is mainly heralded as a “pre-eminent among the violent female devotees of the revolution,” not only because of her unwavering written support for the radical faction of the French… Continue reading