Mary Wollstonecraft: The Struggles of a Revolutionary

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In the eighteenth century, a time of revolution and political reformation, many writers occupied themselves with producing political pamphlets and opinionated essays. Mary Wollstonecraft is no exception to this circle of revolutionary theorists,… Continue reading

A Terrible Bloody Memento

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EBay auctions bricks from the razing of the Berlin Wall, posters for Japanese Internment Camps from World War II, and documents signed by Mussolini.  We might wonder what bids would be placed on… Continue reading

Shelley On the Sea Shore?

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There are pros and cons to being a rock star, and the same goes for being an amazing writer. Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote the ever-clever Ozymandias, hung out with bros Lord Byron &… Continue reading

Percy Shelley: Rebel and Lover

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A rebel in his own right, Percy Bysshe Shelley seemed destined for his life in the limelight as an author, poet, radical, lover, and so on.  Born into wealth, Shelley was always sent… Continue reading

Three Cheers for the Militia: The Peterloo Massacre of 1819

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In the summer of 1819, England was still reeling from the last of the Napoleonic Wars four years prior, and was faced with increasingly disparaging conditions for its people, especially the poor working… Continue reading

Permalink

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Frances (Fanny) Burney, at the tender age of fifteen, put pen to paper and began a lifelong habit of journaling, allowing modern readers transportation to the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century world.  In 1768,… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: The Oxymoronic Feminist

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The writings of Mary Wollstonecraft forecasted a bright future for women in which the “cultivation of the understanding” is superior to “the acquirement of some corporeal accomplishment” (Wollstonecraft 313).  Modern feminists appreciate her… Continue reading

The Image of the Objectified Woman Has Barely Changed

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The image of women in popular media has changed little over the years, with most of the changes happening more recently in the past few decades. Today we can see a plethora of… Continue reading

Privy to the Privy — Political Intimacy in the Monarch’s Dressing Room

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There is little doubt that Jonathan Swift meant to disgust his readership with the intense scatology of “The Lady’s Dressing Room.” The secrets of dear Celia’s morning routine might have traumatized the poor… Continue reading

Writing on the Stall: Swift’s Use of Bathroom Humor

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Throughout his career, Jonathan Swift consistently blurred the line between highbrow satire and lowbrow humor. A polarizing figure in English and Irish literature, Swift’s off-color writing style still finds a way to leave… Continue reading

A Swiftly Indecent Proposal

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Every person with any cultural capital at all knows or has heard of great comedy satire/parody shows like The Colbert Report and Saturday Night Live, and those people most likely don’t think about… Continue reading

The Disguise of Love

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Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina: Or, Love in a Maze, deals with the shenanigans of our female heroine’s (if one believes this the correct term for such a character) attempts to gain the love and… Continue reading

Hindsight’s Clarity

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Daniel Defoe’s, Robinson Crusoe, is a book that exemplifies the art of recollection. For a man to spend 20 odd years alone and shipwrecked on a thought-to-be uninhabited island, and be able to… Continue reading

Alone On Humdrum Island

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          During an age where the most scandalous thing you could do to your family was to leave them and pursue your dreams of being a bonified seafarer, Daniel… Continue reading

From a Cave to a Castle

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In the aftermath of the shipwreck that left Robinson Crusoe stranded, one of his first endeavors was to secure a safe habitation. The development of this habitation and Crusoe’s attitude towards it provides… Continue reading

The Use of Irony and Exaggeration in Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal”

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Jonathan Swift is undoubtedly one, if not the most, prominent satirical writers of the eighteenth century. In his writings he presents a blatant social criticism mocking the political, social, and religious norms of… Continue reading

Robinson Crusoe: Based on a True Story*

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Published nearly 300 years ago, Robinson Crusoe is regarded as one of the earliest novels written in the English language. The text’s widespread success throughout Europe immediately catapulted Daniel Defoe to literary fame… Continue reading

Holding Onto Providence

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It is common for man to find God in times of struggle. Throughout literature we see instances where the protagonist comes upon a challenge in his life, and then finds a way to… Continue reading

Swift’s ties to Ireland and England as Backdrop in A Modest Proposal

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Although Jonathan Swift speaks for the impoverished masses in Ireland holistically in his satirical piece “A Modest Proposal”, he had a personal beef with England and their relationship with Ireland stemming from his… Continue reading

The Importance of Human Interaction in Robinson Crusoe

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If you were stranded on a deserted island, and were only allowed to bring one thing, what would it be? For most, the answer would be cliché, albeit necessary – food, water, shelter,… Continue reading

My Theologian Friday

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After several years of isolation, our survivalist-turned-king Robinson Crusoe is provided a chance to add a human to his growing band of subjects. The “savage” Friday, joining the ranks of Crusoe’s domesticated goats… Continue reading