Remembering Belinda

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This meme is in reference to “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope and used V for Vendetta to illustrate the importance and huge impact The Baron created by cutting off a… Continue reading

The Origins of Happiness: Examining the Memory of Birth in Infant Joy and Infant Sorrow

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Of the paired poems in William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, nearly every pair seems to progress from innocence to experience. There is an inherent sense of loss about them that… Continue reading

Lord Byron: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

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  The Byronic hero is commonly described as arrogant and isolated, while also being seductive and mysterious. Part of the character’s mystery is usually due to their hidden, dark past. Our modern Byronic… Continue reading

AN IVY LEAGUE BRUTE: THE IMPORTANCE OF LANGUAGE IN FRANKENSTEIN

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When most people hear “Frankenstein”, they think of a grunting, green, stitched-up mess of a man. As it turns out, the original author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, would have a few qualms with… Continue reading

ODE: INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY AND NATALIE WOOD

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“Well when we’re young we look at things very idealistically, I guess, and I think Wordsworth means when we grow up that we have to forget the ideals of youth.” –Deanie Loomis. My… Continue reading

The Subliminally Haunted Beach

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When thinking about the Romantic period, people tend to think of love and happily ever after in stories and poetry. Even though writers did focus on those specific themes, they were also heavily… Continue reading

Perspective and Perception, Everything Changes

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In this picture, two people are looking at the same thing but from different perspectives. Because they are seeing it differently, they are also perceiving it differently. (Kate.)

William Wordsworth: Personal Awakening Through the Use of Memory

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Tintern Abbey from a distance With the beginning of a new style of individual experiences and emotions we, as readers, see the shift of focus while studying the works from the years that came before us.  Moving… Continue reading

Beauty and The Blake: The Message Behind The Roses

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Upon reading William Blake’s “The Sick Rose,” taken from his Songs of Innocence and of Experience, a seemingly unlikely but very applicable comparison quickly came to mind. Be it the current publicized hype… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: Guest of Honor at Galentine’s Day Dinner

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Mary Wollstonecraft should be Leslie Knope’s guest of honor at next year’s Galentine’s Day dinner. Leslie Knope needs a framed portrait of Wollstonecraft on her wall of inspirational women. If they were to… Continue reading

Make France Great Again: Burke, The French Revolution, and Conservatism

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[Text] In today’s political landscape, the definition of conservatism has been corrupted by many people. Conservatism is often equated with the Republican Party, but this is not the case. The idea of conservatism… Continue reading

Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room” and the Cosmetic Conspiracy

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The Lady’s Dressing Room Jonathan Swift’s 1730 scatological poem “The Lady’s Dressing Room” details the many horrors and humors a man discovers when he decides to sneak into his lover’s room. Composed during… Continue reading

A NOT-SO MODEST PROPOSAL (OR THE DOWNFALL OF MANKIND AS WE KNOW IT)

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satire [sat-ahyuh r] noun the use of irony, sarcasm, ridicule, or the like, in exposing, denouncing, or deriding vice, folly, etc. (Dictionary.com) In order words, the best kind of comedy. Jonathan Swift’s A… Continue reading

Satire: From Swift to Southpark

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A look into the similarities of satirical responses to national problems from Swift and South Park.

People as a Commodity in “A Modest Proposal”

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“A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift is often regarded as one of the most powerful political essays in literature, and yet, not one word of the piece was written as explicit political advice.… Continue reading

Her Body, His Choice: Rape Culture and 18th Century Literature

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It is a woman’s body, so it should be her choice as to what happens to it, right? Well historically, this has not been the case. This is not a new occurrence, as… Continue reading

The Tragic Lives of Oroonoko and Julius Caesar

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In the story of Oroonoko, Oroonoko, an African prince, is forced to face many trials and tribulations. Eventually he is given the name “Caesar”, and although this may seem like a small detail,… Continue reading

Love, The Invisible Driving Force in Porphyria’s Lover

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Love is one of the most complicated human emotions. It has driven many individuals to engage in actions that they would otherwise not partake in. Love is the emotion that launched a thousand… Continue reading

The Loss of The Savior in Images – The Goblin Market

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Playboy’s 1973 illustrations of The Goblin Market leaves little imagination room as to what is going on in Christina Rossetti’s poem. The poem is very complex in the ideas it presents. Rossetti’s work… Continue reading

The Lady of Shallot Echoed Throughout Time as seen in Song of the Sparrows

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The Lady of Shallot by Alfred Lord Tennyson is one work that has echoed in literature throughout time. Written and then revised, once in 1832 and again in 1842, the story itself draws… Continue reading

Socioeconomic Slut-Shaming

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Comparing Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s “Jenny” to the 90’s rom-com Pretty Woman.

Robert Browning’s Blank Space

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I know. Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” paralleled with Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess?” Believe me, no one understands how absurd this sounds more than I do, but it works, does it not? The… Continue reading

No Country for Young Prostitutes

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When reading Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s Jenny, the reader is faced with a dilemma that has plagued humanity for a very long time. How do we implement change in a meaningful way that helps… Continue reading

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass: Fight Club’s Representation of The Strange Case of Dissociative Identity Disorder

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Unfortunately enough for her, Marla Singer said it best: “You’re Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass”. It is in this line that lies the stanch dichotomy of the human mind, perception and consciousness. Long… Continue reading

SENSUALITY IN “GOBLIN MARKET” CHALLENGES VICTORIAN IDEALS

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While read as a children’s story throughout the nineteenth century, it seems impossible to read Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” and not stop and ask yourself what is actually happening between sisters, Laura and… Continue reading

Murder, He Wrote: Robert Browning and Killing the Duchess and Porphyria

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“Robert Browning is one among those who highlights the scenario of killing women for possessive passions and social status. It is found that the two poems of Robert Browning “My Last Duchess” and… Continue reading

The Strange Case of Ben and Glory: Stevenson Re-imagined as a Buffyverse “Big Bad”

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People are relatively easy to please when it concerns entertainment. The sensational topics which Victorian readers devoured and then relived in subsequent publications and theater adaptations are the same topics which today can… Continue reading

Dramatic Monologue: A look into characterization in Porphyria’s Lover

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Porphyria and her lover Robert Browning most well-known style is the dramatic monologue. So well-known that he has been called the father of the dramatic monologue. According to Philip Hobshaum of the Hudson… Continue reading

Untangling the Lady of Shalott

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The story of Rapunzel in the Disney movie Tangled is unlike any story ever told, except, that is, for the story of “The Lady of Shalott” by Alfred Lord Tennyson. Although, both of… Continue reading

Imperialism and its Emphasis on a Mother/Child Relationship in “The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point”

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The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point- Elizabeth Barrett Browning “Text” Category Imperialism is present throughout the history of the uprising of the British Empire and the effects it has on the readership and… Continue reading