Sharing Satire: Monty Python and Jonathan Swift Creatively Critique Their World

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    As literature for Jonathan Swift and TV/film for Monty Python became relevant, respectively, to a public audience, both, Swift from the 18th century and Monty Python, a British sketch comedy troupe famous in the 1970s and on into the 21st century, harnessed popular mediums… Continue reading

The Reason’s Why Swift May Not Be Viewed So Misogynistic

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When looking over Swift’s, The Lady’s Dressing Room, it is easy to be swept away by the contents, most pertaining to the grotesque. The shock is that the grotesque belongs to Celia, the “victim” of the… Continue reading

The Grotesque in Swift’s….

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Comparing Frankensteins

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I recently watched the 1931 film adaptation Frankenstein directed by James Whale, and was quite shocked by the major differential, focusing on the themes of loneliness, guilt, and social repression, between the screenplay and the original… Continue reading

The Eternal Justice of Man: Why Frankenstein Continues to Serve as a Haunting Metaphor for the African-American Experience in the New World

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  “For an instant I dared to shake off my chains, and look around me with a free and lofty spirit; but the iron had eaten into my flesh, and I sank again,… Continue reading

Transforming Misogyny into Delusional Heroic Narratives in Taxi Driver and “Porphyria’s Lover”

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Originally posted on My Blog:
Sitting in a XXX theater, Travis plays out a murderous fantasy he would later fulfill in Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver. “Now I see this clearly. My whole life…

My Last Duchess: The Exploration of Power, Worth, and Relationships

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Is it truly impossible to envision yourself as the Duke from Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess”? For a moment, try to picture yourself in his gilded shoes: a connoisseur of admirable art, the… Continue reading

His Side, Monster’s side, and Then the Truth

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s book Frankenstein has three different and distinct narrators in her novel. Each one carries a purpose in delivering the story of Frankenstein and his creation. One of the narrators is… Continue reading

The Double in the Details

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“…Good and evil are simply complementary opposites, each a necessary condition for the existence of the other… It [the double] acquires a demonic aspect only because one side of the personality is repressed… Continue reading

American Horror Story: Coven, an Appropriation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

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FX’s American Horror Story: Coven appropriates Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in a modern retelling. The plot orbits teenage witch Zoe Benson and her fellow attendants of Miss Robichaux’s Acadamy for Exceptional Young Ladies, a… Continue reading

Mary Shelley & Tim Burton : The Frankenstein Effect

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Literary monsters have made huge impacts on our society through their influence on books, television and most importantly films. Some of these literary monsters include Dracula and the bogeyman, but thereis one other… Continue reading

The Use of the Isolated Character: Solitude in The Rime of The Ancient Mariner and Frankenstein

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Ever since Adam and Eve were evicted from paradise, countless stories have been written that include characters removed from society that have little or no contact with others. From Robinson Crusoe to more… Continue reading

The Post-Postmodern Byronic “Hero”

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      The Byronic Hero is a well known and easily recognizable character type first developed by Lord George Gordon Byron in “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” and further expanded upon in Byron’s other… Continue reading

The Green Jekyll: Stevenson’s Influence in Raimi’s Spider-Man

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The dichotomy of man’s innate good and evil has always been a fascinating literary subject to me. Among the stories that attempt to look at this troubling juxtaposition of the human soul, none… Continue reading

The Female Writers of Abolition Poetry

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The Female Writers of Abolition Poetry Slavery in Great Brittan was finally abolished in the early nineteenth century through multiple methods, including literature and poetry. Female poets in England really took to writing… Continue reading

An Outcry for Change: The Plea for the Abolition of Slave Trade in England

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In 1788, England ran slave-trades for commercial gain. The slaves were treated horrifically, many ripped from their homes and families and after this were traded from abusive owner to abusive owner. This tragic… Continue reading

Enlightenment: Wordsworth and Ross Work Together to Seek A New Way Home

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The French Revolution evoked feelings for sympathizing life, troubles, and speech of the ‘common man’. The French Revolution was considered to be the first modern revolution because it changed the structure of society.… Continue reading

“The Soft Soul Of America”: Oothoon as Nature in Blake’s “Visions of the Daughters of Albion”

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William Blake’s poem Visions of the Daughters of Albion presents the rape of young Oothoon and the responses to this violence from Oothoon, her love Theotormon, and her assailant Bromion. Many scholars see substantial… Continue reading

Religion and its Justifications for Slavery During the Abolitionist Movement

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“Am I Not A Man And A Brother?”  The design was originally adopted as the seal of the Society for the Abolition of Slavery in England in the 1780s.     According to… Continue reading

A Textual Analysis of Wordsworth’s “Intimations of Immortality”

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William Wordsworth has said that, “nothing was more difficult for me in childhood than to admit the notion of death as a state applicable to my own being” (552, Wordsworth). In Wordsworth’s “Ode:… Continue reading

The French Revolution and its Influence on Mary Wollstonecraft’s Opinions on Educational Rights

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During the late 1700’s the place currently known for their pastries, love, and the Eiffel tower underwent a radical social and political revolution. This revolution was known as the French Revolution that last… Continue reading

A Historical Perspective of the Narrative of Mary Prince

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Mary Prince, the first woman to write a personal slave narrative account. Mary Prince, a slave born in Bermuda, wrote one of the first slave narratives ever written by a woman. She details… Continue reading

A Powerful Relationship: Nature and the Human Mind

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Before hanging out in nature suspended from an Eno hammock in a pair of Chacos was popular amongst students at the university in Fayetteville, Arkansas, poets such as William Wordsworth and Percy B.… Continue reading

Dude “Crusoe” is Famous!

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Robinson Crusoe is the story of a man who gets shipwrecked and marooned on a deserted island for many years, far away from the civilization and society he has grown up in and… Continue reading

The Industrial Revolution as an Antithesis to Romantic Poetry

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The Industrial Revolution had the most significant effect on Romantic poetry because it served as a direct antithesis to the poet’s subject matter during that time. The Industrial Revolution directly correlated with the… Continue reading

Alexander Pope’s Evident Misogyny in The Rape of the Lock

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During the height of satirical workmanship, Alexander Pope writes in response to an actual situation that occurred to the detriment of Mrs. Arabella Fermor. (Longman, 2471) In this situation, a lock of Arabella’s… Continue reading

Agency and Liberation in Haywood’s Fantomina

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Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina: Or, Love in a Maze takes a different approach to female agency namely in the method in which her protagonist attains her sense of freedom. By occupying various stages of… Continue reading

He’s a Man, Man: Hegemonic Masculinity in “Robinson Crusoe”

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Daniel Defoe’s bestseller, Robinson Crusoe, marked the beginning of stories obsessed with the “survival of the fittest.” However, going beyond the concept of survival, Robinson Crusoe became influential by defining its title character,… Continue reading

Swift to Judge: Satire and Culture in Gulliver’s Travels and Idiocracy

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No one can argue that Mike Judge’s mediocre comedy deserves as much criticism and examination as Swift’s literary masterpiece. Idiocracy is light entertainment with social criticism wielded as a blunt instrument as opposed… Continue reading

Swift’s Ridiculousness to Reality through a Historical Viewpoint

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  The Pope has decided to follow Swift`s advice to help out with Ireland`s economy. Through the beginning of the 18th century, English and Irish relations were in pitiful standings. Some would say that their… Continue reading