Tag Archive: Abolition

Imperialism and its Emphasis on a Mother/Child Relationship in “The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point”

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The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point- Elizabeth Barrett Browning “Text” Category Imperialism is present throughout the history of the uprising of the British Empire and the effects it has on the readership and… Continue reading

The History of Mary Prince, a tremendous step towards Freedom

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“White people who keep slaves think that black people are like cattle, without natural affection. But my heart tells me it is far otherwise.” It is by her emotional standpoints that Mary Prince… Continue reading

Religion and its Justifications for Slavery During the Abolitionist Movement

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“Am I Not A Man And A Brother?”  The design was originally adopted as the seal of the Society for the Abolition of Slavery in England in the 1780s.     According to… Continue reading

A Historical Perspective of the Narrative of Mary Prince

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Mary Prince, the first woman to write a personal slave narrative account. Mary Prince, a slave born in Bermuda, wrote one of the first slave narratives ever written by a woman. She details… Continue reading

What was Barbauld really talking about?

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Anna Letitia Barbauld’s “Epistle to William Wilberforce, Esq.  On the Rejection of the Bill for Abolishing the Slave Trade” is a text that expresses ideals and emotions present in late 18th century. Abolition… Continue reading

The Sorrow Beyond Slavery

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Arguably, fates worse than slavery are hard to find. Hannah More and Eaglesfield Smith’s 1797 The Sorrows of Yamba or The Negro Woman’s Lamentation expounds upon the degradation of captivity and transatlantic voyage… Continue reading

Empathy and the Economy

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A recent scientific study has found empirical evidence that reading literary fiction makes a person more empathic. But this seems to have been the general consensus with writers and lovers of literature for… Continue reading

Mary Prince: From a Female Perspective

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Published in 1831, when slavery was still heavily practiced in the West Indies, “The History of Mary Prince, a West Indian Slave,” written by Prince herself, painted a never before seen picture of… Continue reading

Not Ceasing From Mental Fight — William Blake’s Mystic Vision

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William Blake’s strange collection of poetry and polemic is a striking juxtaposition of form and function. Many of his poems, seen on their own, appear much like the didactic and socially-minded religious pop-poetry… Continue reading

Allegedly Olaudah: The Origin of Equiano

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Upon its publication in 1789, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano dramatically altered society’s outlook on race relations, the slave trade, and the abolitionist movement. Fueled by Equiano’s firsthand accounts… Continue reading

Am I Not a Woman and a Sister? The Story of Mary Prince

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Standing on the shoulders of the famous ex-slave Olaudah Equiano, Mary Prince, a Bermuda-born slave who lived from 1788 until 1833, was a woman of many firsts (Simkin). Prince was the first woman… Continue reading

The Not So Benevolent Masters

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“Sometimes farces such as ‘The Benevolent Planters’…can be just as, if not more effective, than a straightforward and truthful, although less imaginative work” (“Abolition” 1).  Published in 1789, Thomas Bellamy’s The Benevolent Planters… Continue reading

Olaudah Equiano, the First of Many.

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Olaudah Equiano, also known as Gustavus Vassa, was a former slave who lived from around 1745 to 1797. His work is still extremely influential today as he left his footprint in literature as… Continue reading

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