Tag Archive: Author

The Idealization of Childhood in Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Moonrise Kingdom

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Many film goers can think of their favorite quotes from a movie. Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom is rife with them. “That’s not a safe altitude (Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson, 2012)..” “I’m going to find a tree to… Continue reading

Alexander Pope’s Condescending Mock-Epic Towards Women’s Vanity

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Gender roles in society have always put women in vain. Whether, in literature or in actual events, sexism has always been a great topic for confrontation. Alexander Pope wrote The Rape of the… Continue reading

Without Education–There is no “Happily Ever After”

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Mary Astell is a firm believer that women’s rights are just as important as a man’s. In her essay Some Reflections Upon Marriage, she argues these positions. Mary Astell grew up in Newcastle… Continue reading

H. Rider Haggard, Author of She

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H. Rider Haggard became one of the most popular fiction novelists of his time. At the peak of his career, he was writing two to three novels a year. Despite his late start,… Continue reading

Christina Rossetti: Lizzie becomes Laura

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            Often, it is said, “life imitates art.” In many ways, some by design and others mere happenstance, the reverse applies to the life of Christina Rossetti and her… Continue reading

Augusta as Astarte, Byron as Byronic hero

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The guilt-ridden hero invented in Lord Byron’s Manfred was not mere fiction with vague undertones of an incestuous relationship, but rather an extension of Lord Byron himself.  Byron’s allusion to a pagan goddess… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

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       In 1797 an event occurred that no one person could ever fathom. The literary superstars, William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, gave birth to a literary protégé that would think up… Continue reading

Coleridge’s “Christabel” and Pyschological and Sexual Frustrations

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     Samuel Taylor Coleridge attempts a mighty handful of ambiguous themes with his work “Christabel.” In this work, ambitiously planned for seven parts yet only spanning two, Coleridge discusses unique and strange relationships… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: The Oxymoronic Feminist

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The writings of Mary Wollstonecraft forecasted a bright future for women in which the “cultivation of the understanding” is superior to “the acquirement of some corporeal accomplishment” (Wollstonecraft 313).  Modern feminists appreciate her… Continue reading

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