Tag Archive: Byronic Hero

Lord Byron: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

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  The Byronic hero is commonly described as arrogant and isolated, while also being seductive and mysterious. Part of the character’s mystery is usually due to their hidden, dark past. Our modern Byronic… Continue reading

The Post-Postmodern Byronic “Hero”

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      The Byronic Hero is a well known and easily recognizable character type first developed by Lord George Gordon Byron in “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” and further expanded upon in Byron’s other… Continue reading

Flyin’ Solo; The Original and Intergalactic Byronic Heroes

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Byron’s hero is no small known creation in the world of literature, particularly in his work “Manfred”. This protagonist defines the Byronic hero as more or less the hero you hate to love,… Continue reading

The Mad Scientist

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The character type that seems to really exemplify the gothic genre is the Byronic hero. Coined to classify characters like those in Byron’s works, particularly Manfred, and even Lord Byron himself, this particular… Continue reading

The Modern Byronic Hero

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Popularized by Lord Byron, the Byronic hero is a fiction character type that has been around  for centuries and its wake can be felt in today’s popular culture.  Although it first appeared in Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage in 1812,… Continue reading

The Gothic Tragedy of Stars Wars

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  In Lord Byron’s Manfred we see the tragic life played out of the main character Manfred. The plot follows a story arc that has influenced many stories that we see today. Most notable of these is… Continue reading

Manfred, a confessional.

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Lord Byron lived one of the more interesting lives of the romantic poets. He has been recognized as the most flamboyant and notorious of the romantic poets. His work Manfred is one of… Continue reading

The Legacy Within Watchmen

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 -“My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings. Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” Percy Shelly, “Ozymandias” 

Lord Byron as the Byronic Template

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Lord Byron had a tenuous pauper to prince upbringing, and gradually became a self-made man. The title he inherited from his great uncle helped him in this endeavor, while his abandonment by his… Continue reading

Mad, Bad, Dangerous and Byronic

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Upon meeting George Gordon Byron, Lady Caroline Lamb famously called him “mad, bad, and dangerous to know.”  And even though the end of their affair drove her to madness and obsession, Lady Lamb… Continue reading

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