Tag Archive: duality

The Duality of Innocence and Experience in William Blake’s “The Tyger”

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As a poem, William Blake’s “The Tyger” functions much the same way that the rest of Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience does; teetering on the precipice of duality in not only… Continue reading

Jekyll and Hyde Adaptations: in a League of Their Own

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886), sought to confront the social norms of the Victorian Period by infusing realism into Gothic tropes. No longer were characters… Continue reading

Duality: Stevenson’s Jekyll and Hyde- A ‘Fine Line’ Doesn’t Exist

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Humans have been debating and fighting over what is considered good and what is evil since before the early ages. In the early ages though, good was determined by religion and anything or… Continue reading

The Strange Case of Robert Louis Stevenson and Deacon Brodie: Exploring the Inspiration for Dr.Jekyll and Mr.Hyde

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.Hyde, is a true psychological thriller, and brilliantly encompasses the idea of Victorian era duality. However, upon delving deep into the inspiration for… Continue reading

Duality and Denying Our Primal Nature in Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde is one of the the Victorian period’s most prominent novellas, notable for it’s early interest in the duality of human nature, a… Continue reading

Artists’ Depictions of the Many Faces of Mr. Hyde

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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde creates a literary space, where puzzled readers take on the challenge of assigning signifiers to the mysterious nature of Hyde and interpreting the distinctive rhetorical sublime… Continue reading

The Double in the Details

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“…Good and evil are simply complementary opposites, each a necessary condition for the existence of the other… It [the double] acquires a demonic aspect only because one side of the personality is repressed… Continue reading

The Post-Postmodern Byronic “Hero”

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      The Byronic Hero is a well known and easily recognizable character type first developed by Lord George Gordon Byron in “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” and further expanded upon in Byron’s other… Continue reading

The Green Jekyll: Stevenson’s Influence in Raimi’s Spider-Man

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The dichotomy of man’s innate good and evil has always been a fascinating literary subject to me. Among the stories that attempt to look at this troubling juxtaposition of the human soul, none… Continue reading

Jekyll in the Flesh: The Dual Mind in Victorian Englad

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Following the 1886 publication of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, author Robert Louis Stevenson maintained that the inspiration for what is now his most famous story was self-generated; the product of… Continue reading

The Strangely Immortal Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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The story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, written by the illustrious Robert Louis Stevenson, has had some of the greatest lasting power of any story. The first time I encountered the original… Continue reading

Dr. Jekyll and Mr Gray

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The concept of the duality of human nature has been a pivotal idea in western culture since the days of Plato.  In 1866, Robert Louis Stevenson created a story in which the evil… Continue reading

Dr. Jekyll and Tyler Durden: Not Just About Duality.

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“Two sides? You’re Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass.” -Marla Springer, Fight Club (1999)

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