Tag Archive: French Revolution

Make France Great Again: Burke, The French Revolution, and Conservatism

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[Text] In today’s political landscape, the definition of conservatism has been corrupted by many people. Conservatism is often equated with the Republican Party, but this is not the case. The idea of conservatism… Continue reading

“The Still, Sad Music of Humanity”: The French Revolution’s Influence on Wordsworth’s “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey

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William Wordsworth’s Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798, usually abbreviated “Tintern Abbey,” was written close to the end… Continue reading

The French Revolution and its Influence on Mary Wollstonecraft’s Opinions on Educational Rights

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During the late 1700’s the place currently known for their pastries, love, and the Eiffel tower underwent a radical social and political revolution. This revolution was known as the French Revolution that last… Continue reading

Wollstonecraft’s Sense and The Senseless: An Impossible Solution

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26 Wednesday Feb 2014 Posted by christianaewart            Being an influential writer of thought during the time of the French Revolution was a task of dedication and strong political,… Continue reading

The Context of Theatre, Nature, and Science in Burke’s “Reflections”

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The French Revolution started in France in 1789 and lasted until 1799. It marked the upheaval and eventual abolition of the French monarchy. The ten year span saw major events such as the… Continue reading

The French Revolution as it can be Read in Visions of the Daughters of Albion

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The French Revolution as it can be Read in Visions of the Daughters of Albion William Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion is saturated with symbolism and ideological proclamations, one of them… Continue reading

Ideological and Repressive State Apparatuses in Burke’s Reflections on the Revolution in France

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The Idealogical and Repressive State Apparatuses RSA are social practices; which are imposed on individuals in a society and inform of the limits of the people. The ISA seeks to shape the norms… Continue reading

Wollstonecraft, Revolution, and Human Casualty

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In November of 1790, political writer Edmund Burke published Reflections on the Revolution in France, lamenting the overturning of the French monarchy, sympathizing with the king and queen and speculating on the negative… Continue reading

Reflections In A Dusty Mirror

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It has been said that the road to hell is paved with good intentions. In Edmund Burke’s case, it would seem good intentions pave what is an otherwise unstable argument.  In Reflection on… Continue reading

Williams’ Radical Journalism

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While Helen Maria Williams is mainly heralded as a “pre-eminent among the violent female devotees of the revolution,” not only because of her unwavering written support for the radical faction of the French… Continue reading

A Terrible Bloody Memento

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EBay auctions bricks from the razing of the Berlin Wall, posters for Japanese Internment Camps from World War II, and documents signed by Mussolini.  We might wonder what bids would be placed on… Continue reading

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Frances (Fanny) Burney, at the tender age of fifteen, put pen to paper and began a lifelong habit of journaling, allowing modern readers transportation to the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth century world.  In 1768,… Continue reading

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