Tag Archive: legacy

Haywood, Fantomina, Sovay, and Babooshka: The Legacy of Disguising Oneself to Gain Information and Experience

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From the time women were able to write for a living, they were more than eager to rewrite the stereotypical women characters that men had been creating. However, authors like Eliza Haywood knew… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft’s Feminism Legacy

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Mary Wollstonecraft left a legacy that impacts feminism today.

THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS: The Legacy Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” Leaves Behind in Martin Brest’s “Scent of a Woman”

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The future is unknown until we create it ourselves. In life we experience a surplus of situations that are out of our control. We do not get to choose which disease takes over… Continue reading

My Own Private Eden: Blake and Von Trier’s Efforts at a Personal Fall

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William Blake and Lars Von Trier are two artists who’ve made some strong efforts to reshape theological structures to more accurately explain human tendencies than the original stories did. In Songs of Innocence… Continue reading

The Idealization of Childhood in Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Moonrise Kingdom

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Many film goers can think of their favorite quotes from a movie. Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom is rife with them. “That’s not a safe altitude (Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson, 2012)..” “I’m going to find a tree to… Continue reading

Some Reflections Upon “Happily Ever After”

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Disney’s line of princess-themed films have come a long way in terms of the portrayal of their leading female characters. Early films like Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty feature damsels in distress who simply… Continue reading

Brutality in Satire: The Similarities of A Modest Proposal and American Psycho

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One of the biggest risks a satirist can face is his or her readers entirely missing the point of the work. Two clear instances of this have taken place decades apart from one another,… Continue reading

The Green Jekyll: Stevenson’s Influence in Raimi’s Spider-Man

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The dichotomy of man’s innate good and evil has always been a fascinating literary subject to me. Among the stories that attempt to look at this troubling juxtaposition of the human soul, none… Continue reading

Swift to Judge: Satire and Culture in Gulliver’s Travels and Idiocracy

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No one can argue that Mike Judge’s mediocre comedy deserves as much criticism and examination as Swift’s literary masterpiece. Idiocracy is light entertainment with social criticism wielded as a blunt instrument as opposed… Continue reading

Frankenstein in Space: Creation and Responsibility

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The story of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has so permeated the literary and cultural world that its likeness can be found in multitudes of adaptations in every medium: literature, movies, and even television. Many… Continue reading

The Legacy of Friedrich Engels in Modern Manhattan

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Friedrich Engels left a huge impression on his readers when his piece titled The Conditions of the Working Class in England in 1844 was published in Germany in 1845 and then translated into… Continue reading

The Modern Byronic Hero

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Popularized by Lord Byron, the Byronic hero is a fiction character type that has been around  for centuries and its wake can be felt in today’s popular culture.  Although it first appeared in Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage in 1812,… Continue reading

The Strangely Immortal Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

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The story of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, written by the illustrious Robert Louis Stevenson, has had some of the greatest lasting power of any story. The first time I encountered the original… Continue reading

Dr. Jekyll and Tyler Durden: Not Just About Duality.

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“Two sides? You’re Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Jackass.” -Marla Springer, Fight Club (1999)

The Loss of the Frame Narrative of Frankenstein in Film

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One of the central features of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein is the frame structure that encapsulates the entire tale. It is a particularly complex device, and features the narrations from several different viewpoints… Continue reading

The Legacy Within Watchmen

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 -“My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings. Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” Percy Shelly, “Ozymandias” 

Ancient Mariners and Pirates, a Legacy

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From the opening scene of the Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, the allusions to Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner are rampant.  The movie contains several gothic themes… Continue reading

The Groundbreaking Mary Prince

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“All slaves want to be free, to be free is sweet…I can tell by myself what other slaves fell, and by what they have told me.  The man that says slaves be quite… Continue reading

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