Tag Archive: Literature

It’s a Goblin’s Goblin’s Goblin’s Market

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As so often seen in the Victorian Age, the idea of the world being a “man’s world” does not come as a surprise when thinking of Victorian literature. However, Christina Rossetti puts forth… Continue reading

Fascination With the Beast Within: Mr Hyde as Venom

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A man accidentally adopts a second personality that is simultaneously a part of him and a completely separate being…

Exploring Jonathan Swift’s Motive and Attitude toward Women in “A Lady’s Dressing Room”

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The motive behind Jonathan Swift’s poem, “A Lady’s Dressing Room” has long been debated. Most interpretations, past and present, rely on the belief that Swift, himself, was a misogynist, and for good reason.… Continue reading

Christina Rossetti, “Goblin Market” & The Limits We Are Willing To Go.

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Goblin Market is a narrative poem, penned by Christina Rossetti in 1862 (Damrosch & Dettmar, pg. 1643). This particular piece is considered to be her greatest work by many, and it has best… Continue reading

SCROOGE MEME

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I imagine the expressions of Fred’s party guests to look something like this at seeing Scrooge at the Christmas gathering; and not only that, the once embittered old man looks happy to be… Continue reading

AN IVY LEAGUE BRUTE: THE IMPORTANCE OF LANGUAGE IN FRANKENSTEIN

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When most people hear “Frankenstein”, they think of a grunting, green, stitched-up mess of a man. As it turns out, the original author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, would have a few qualms with… Continue reading

The Post-Postmodern Byronic “Hero”

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      The Byronic Hero is a well known and easily recognizable character type first developed by Lord George Gordon Byron in “Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage” and further expanded upon in Byron’s other… Continue reading

Victor: Mary Shelly’s Beowulf

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During my Heroes and Monsters of the North Sea Literature course, Professor Smith made the argument that the epic poem Beowulf was a tale that centered on humanity’s duality. To a more causal… Continue reading

The Line

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I had a discussion with a friend that spurred this. The word literally has evolved to the point where its secondary meaning also incorporates hyperbole. My friend was upset. He critiqued that words… Continue reading

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