Tag Archive: manfred

Lord Byron: The Man, The Myth, The Legend

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  The Byronic hero is commonly described as arrogant and isolated, while also being seductive and mysterious. Part of the character’s mystery is usually due to their hidden, dark past. Our modern Byronic… Continue reading

Flyin’ Solo; The Original and Intergalactic Byronic Heroes

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Byron’s hero is no small known creation in the world of literature, particularly in his work “Manfred”. This protagonist defines the Byronic hero as more or less the hero you hate to love,… Continue reading

The Modern Byronic Hero

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Popularized by Lord Byron, the Byronic hero is a fiction character type that has been around  for centuries and its wake can be felt in today’s popular culture.  Although it first appeared in Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage in 1812,… Continue reading

The Gothic Tragedy of Stars Wars

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  In Lord Byron’s Manfred we see the tragic life played out of the main character Manfred. The plot follows a story arc that has influenced many stories that we see today. Most notable of these is… Continue reading

Manfred, a confessional.

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Lord Byron lived one of the more interesting lives of the romantic poets. He has been recognized as the most flamboyant and notorious of the romantic poets. His work Manfred is one of… Continue reading

The Legacy Within Watchmen

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 -“My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings. Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!” Percy Shelly, “Ozymandias” 

Similarities Between Manfred and Satan

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Throughout Lord Byron’s Manfred there are several allusions and references to John Milton’s Paradise Lost, specifically to the words of Satan. The development of the satanic hero is displayed in Manfred through his… Continue reading

Augusta as Astarte, Byron as Byronic hero

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The guilt-ridden hero invented in Lord Byron’s Manfred was not mere fiction with vague undertones of an incestuous relationship, but rather an extension of Lord Byron himself.  Byron’s allusion to a pagan goddess… Continue reading

Manfred and Victor and the Dark Depths of Solitude

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“Solitude is painful when one is young, but delightful when one is more mature.”  So are the words of the great Albert Einstein, and, in many cases, is quite true.  However, for some,… Continue reading

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