Tag Archive: Mary Shelley

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

Tag Yourself Meme: Victorian and Romantic Writer Edition

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Explanation: this meme was inspired by this one from tumblr, but I’m of the humble opinion that this one is far superior because it has more authors, more time periods, and has female… Continue reading

AN IVY LEAGUE BRUTE: THE IMPORTANCE OF LANGUAGE IN FRANKENSTEIN

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When most people hear “Frankenstein”, they think of a grunting, green, stitched-up mess of a man. As it turns out, the original author of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, would have a few qualms with… Continue reading

Comparing Frankensteins

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I recently watched the 1931 film adaptation Frankenstein directed by James Whale, and was quite shocked by the major differential, focusing on the themes of loneliness, guilt, and social repression, between the screenplay and the original… Continue reading

American Horror Story: Coven, an Appropriation of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

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FX’s American Horror Story: Coven appropriates Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein in a modern retelling. The plot orbits teenage witch Zoe Benson and her fellow attendants of Miss Robichaux’s Acadamy for Exceptional Young Ladies, a… Continue reading

Mary Shelley & Tim Burton : The Frankenstein Effect

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Literary monsters have made huge impacts on our society through their influence on books, television and most importantly films. Some of these literary monsters include Dracula and the bogeyman, but thereis one other… Continue reading

Frankenstein in Space: Creation and Responsibility

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The story of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has so permeated the literary and cultural world that its likeness can be found in multitudes of adaptations in every medium: literature, movies, and even television. Many… Continue reading

“Franken-Shelley” Autobiography?

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Everyone knows the classic tell of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; “In trying to create life, young student Victor Frankenstein unleashes forces beyond his control, setting into motion a long and tragic chain of events… Continue reading

Splice: Shelley’s Explorations Continued

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is potentially one of the most iconic pieces of literature ever written, at least in terms of the sheer number of adaptations it has seen across an array of mediums in… Continue reading

The Study of Anatomy within Frankenstein

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Through the novel of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, we learn that the process that Victor goes through to get the body of his creation is almost over looked, rather not explained. The point… Continue reading

The Blair Frankenstein Project

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A Journalistic Film Review of The Frankenstein Theory By Jeffrey W. Hollingsworth We’ve seen ghosts, demons, serial killers and even superheroes constructed into the found footage film genre, but now, classic horror icons… Continue reading

The Lasting Tale of Frankenstein

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The concept coming from Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley, is one of those stories that breaks through the standard exposure most literary works see and latches onto popular culture so that it sticks around… Continue reading

Science And Fiction: Penetrating the Recesses of Nature

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When reading Mary Shelley’s first novel, Frankenstein, from a standpoint steeped in advanced scientific technology, modern day readers find it easy to scoff at Victor Frankenstein’s ill-advised scheme of reanimation. However, the popular… Continue reading

Defining Factors of Life

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Throughout Frankenstein, Mary Shelley creates subliminal critiques on the enlightenment that Victor’s exploration strives to grasp throughout the tale. She provides critiques and curiosity that are long-lasting and well-rounded thoughts which prove the… Continue reading

Mariners and Monsters

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The frame narrative that opens Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein bears several suggestions of Coleridge’s The Rime of The Ancient Mariner, both through the setting and via some direct allusions to the poem.  The references… Continue reading

The Nameless Child

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The monster in Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel, Frankenstein, is often erroneously referred to as Frankenstein, and yet the creature is never given an actual name in the novel.  Frankenstein’s creation is given many… Continue reading

Frankenstein’s Secrecy

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Throughout Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, several themes come into play; knowledge, sublime nature, monstrosity, and secrecy to name a few. One theme that I noticed while reading the novel… Continue reading

Victor Frankenstein — Reanimator

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Victor Frankenstein and his monstrous progeny have hugely impacted horror and science fiction. However, much of contemporary cultural knowledge of the Frankenstein story has more in common with its subsequent adaptations than the… Continue reading

Shelley’s Gothic

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The Gothic novel capitalizes on bringing to life the horror of the fallen world. It relies heavily on setting and characters to demonstrate the total depravity of man. By taking a close look… Continue reading

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein Through The Years

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Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: or, The Modern Prometheus is quite possibly one of the most continuously adapted texts of all time. Since its publication in 1818, Shelley’s text has been adapted for the stage,… Continue reading

Young and Old Frankenstein, A Parody Parallels.

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  Frankenstein by Mary Shelley has been adapted in an amplitude of ways for both the stage and screen. Often in the screen adaptations many different aspects of the original are changed however… Continue reading

The Loss of the Frame Narrative of Frankenstein in Film

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One of the central features of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein is the frame structure that encapsulates the entire tale. It is a particularly complex device, and features the narrations from several different viewpoints… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: Influence Beyond the Grave

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        Mary Wollstonecraft’s life was a life filled with literary and personal discoveries, and regardless of a slight smearing of her character upon her death, her works have influenced an… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

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       In 1797 an event occurred that no one person could ever fathom. The literary superstars, William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, gave birth to a literary protégé that would think up… Continue reading

Victor Frankenstein’s Unhallowed Arts

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Mary Shelley’s novel shares many similarities with Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” including the possible reading of her work being an allegory for the consequences of tampering with… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

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One of the most famous novels ever published (Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus) was written by the time its author, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, turned 19. 

Shelley On the Sea Shore?

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There are pros and cons to being a rock star, and the same goes for being an amazing writer. Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote the ever-clever Ozymandias, hung out with bros Lord Byron &… Continue reading

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