Tag Archive: misogyny

300 Years of Feminism: Hypocrisy as the Downfall of Misogyny

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When a person hears the names of Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Virginia Woolf they can hardly be separated from the notion of women’s rights. Although two of them lived and died before… Continue reading

Full Disclosure: Magnification in Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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A close reading of Jonathan Swift’s famously obscene poem “The Lady’s Dressing Room” offers several targets for the author’s satire. The focus on Celia’s vanity and deceit, compared with the forgivability of Strephon’s crimes… Continue reading

The Reason’s Why Swift May Not Be Viewed So Misogynistic

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When looking over Swift’s, The Lady’s Dressing Room, it is easy to be swept away by the contents, most pertaining to the grotesque. The shock is that the grotesque belongs to Celia, the “victim” of the… Continue reading

Alexander Pope’s Evident Misogyny in The Rape of the Lock

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During the height of satirical workmanship, Alexander Pope writes in response to an actual situation that occurred to the detriment of Mrs. Arabella Fermor. (Longman, 2471) In this situation, a lock of Arabella’s… Continue reading

The Lesser of Two Evils: Fantomina’s World and Our Own

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When confronted with Eliza Haywood’s novel Fantomina, or really any other text dealing with women of antiquity, I imagine one reaction within the average modern reader is as follows: well, at least women have it better… Continue reading

The Misogyny of Jonathan Swift & the Feminist Response of Lady Mary Montagu

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Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room,” written in 1732, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s direct response, “The Reasons that Induced Dr. S to Write a Poem Call’d the Lady’s Dressing Room” from 1734… Continue reading

The Reasons that Required Lady Montagu to write a Poem criticizing Dr. S.

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18th century society in England mandated a chasm as wide as the Atlantic Ocean between the roles of the sexes. The men supposed themselves England: superior, imperial, and conquering, while giving the women… Continue reading

Swift to Judge a Lady’s Dressing Room

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Jonathan Swift  shamelessly shows us his views about women  in his poem “A Lady’s Dressing Room.”  As such Swift has been been called misogynist throughout his satire. However I believe that while Swifts… Continue reading

Fantomina’s New World: Misogyny and Opportunity through Prostitution in 1700s England

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In her work Fantomina: or Love in a Maze, Eliza Haywood explores the misogyny and the atypical brand of freedom prostitution in 1700s England offered women. When Fantomina observes the “mistresses” in the… Continue reading

“Hail, Wayward Queen”: Misogyny and the Spleen

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In the eighteenth century the spleen served as a means of psychological oppression and as a mechanism for the misogynistic construct of hysteria. Although the mental affliction was not scientifically understood, our predecessors… Continue reading

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