Tag Archive: religion

More Than a Misanthrope: Johnathan Swift’s Philosophies

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From its onset, Johnathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels has a misanthropic tone. A reader can reason that Swift is a misanthrope and that he holds nothing but hate for humanity. However, “It is true… Continue reading

It’s a Goblin’s Goblin’s Goblin’s Market

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As so often seen in the Victorian Age, the idea of the world being a “man’s world” does not come as a surprise when thinking of Victorian literature. However, Christina Rossetti puts forth… Continue reading

The Critique of Moral Law in Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience

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In William Blake’s poetry collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, he examines the ways in which people relate and interpret the world around them. He stresses two perspectives: innocence and experience. These perspectives are… Continue reading

William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper”: Utilizing Poetry to Expose Moral and Religious Tensions

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A series of diverse, politically-charged poems, William Blake’s “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience,” evoke numerous thoughts and convictions in his audience, primarily exploring how a state of mind can influence perception… Continue reading

It’s Not You, It’s God: Christina Rossetti’s Relationship with Religion and Its Subsequent Role in her Poetry

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I. INTRODUCTION Setting: 20th century Mont-Blanc retreat. Four reincarnated Romantic and Victorian poets are climbing the summit of the mountain, talking amongst themselves. Elizabeth Barrett (Not-Yet) Browning: So, like, this guy keeps sending… Continue reading

“Eat me, drink me, love me”: An Analysis of Masculinity, Spirituality, and Sexuality in “The Goblin Market”

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The popular image of forbidden fruit, stemming from the story of Adam and Eve in the book of Genesis, has become salient in numerous forms of media. Some of the most well-known renditions… Continue reading

The Rossetti’s Forbidden Desires

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  Christina Rossetti’s “Goblin Market” exposes the ideas and looks placed on women while also combining shocking concepts for that time.  Within the poem the reader will clearly see the sexual tones being used… Continue reading

My Own Private Eden: Blake and Von Trier’s Efforts at a Personal Fall

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William Blake and Lars Von Trier are two artists who’ve made some strong efforts to reshape theological structures to more accurately explain human tendencies than the original stories did. In Songs of Innocence… Continue reading

Without Education–There is no “Happily Ever After”

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Mary Astell is a firm believer that women’s rights are just as important as a man’s. In her essay Some Reflections Upon Marriage, she argues these positions. Mary Astell grew up in Newcastle… Continue reading

Religion and its Justifications for Slavery During the Abolitionist Movement

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“Am I Not A Man And A Brother?”  The design was originally adopted as the seal of the Society for the Abolition of Slavery in England in the 1780s.     According to… Continue reading

Religious Appeal in Stories of the Slave Trade

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When reading William Cowper’s The Negro’s Complaint, and also The Sorrows of Yamba or, The Negro Woman’s Lamentation by Hannah More and Eaglesfield Smith, I found there to be a prominent stylistic element… Continue reading

The Spiritual Journey of Robinson Crusoe

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Robinson Crusoe is a novel that easily lends itself to analytical discussions surrounding themes. The novel is not simply a tale of adventure and excitement and one should not place shallow expectations on… Continue reading

Industry as the New Religion in Dickens’ Hard Times

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In Charles Dickens’ 1854 novel, Hard Times, we get a vision of a city and its people that have become devoted to industry and profit, to the benefit of few and the detriment… Continue reading

Not Ceasing From Mental Fight — William Blake’s Mystic Vision

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William Blake’s strange collection of poetry and polemic is a striking juxtaposition of form and function. Many of his poems, seen on their own, appear much like the didactic and socially-minded religious pop-poetry… Continue reading

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