Tag Archive: Romanticism

An Exploration of Guilt and Penance in Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Culpability and wrongdoing are often used motifs in poem and prose. Guilt and penance used in Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner as not only a plot device but a window into the human psyche of… Continue reading

300 Years of Feminism: Hypocrisy as the Downfall of Misogyny

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When a person hears the names of Mary Astell, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Virginia Woolf they can hardly be separated from the notion of women’s rights. Although two of them lived and died before… Continue reading

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

I WISH THAT I COULD BE LIKE THE COOL KIDS: HOW THE AGE OF INNOCENCE HAS ALTERED

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Throughout William Blake’s, Songs of Innocence and Experience, he goes to great lengths on both accounts, of showing the true differences between a life of innocence, and how this is altered once experience has come… Continue reading

Gothic and Romanticism: An Analysis of The Supernatural and Sublime In Mary Robinson’s, “The Haunted Beach”

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Seeped in Gothic themes and influences, the murder of a shipwrecked sailor divulges with details in Mary Robinson’s, “The Haunted Beach”. However, explanations surrounding the characters are scarce; the reasoning as to why… Continue reading

The Scarlet Albatross: The Ancient Mariner’s Own Cross To Bear

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What goes around truly does come back around, and karma tends to come back to us with a vengeance. The world has a mysterious way of making sure people’s wrong-doings are brought to… Continue reading

My Own Private Eden: Blake and Von Trier’s Efforts at a Personal Fall

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William Blake and Lars Von Trier are two artists who’ve made some strong efforts to reshape theological structures to more accurately explain human tendencies than the original stories did. In Songs of Innocence… Continue reading

“The Still, Sad Music of Humanity”: The French Revolution’s Influence on Wordsworth’s “Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey

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William Wordsworth’s Lines Composed a Few Miles above Tintern Abbey, on Revisiting the Banks of the Wye during a Tour, July 13, 1798, usually abbreviated “Tintern Abbey,” was written close to the end… Continue reading

The Idealization of Childhood in Wordsworth’s “Ode” and Moonrise Kingdom

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Many film goers can think of their favorite quotes from a movie. Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom is rife with them. “That’s not a safe altitude (Moonrise Kingdom, Wes Anderson, 2012)..” “I’m going to find a tree to… Continue reading

“The Soft Soul Of America”: Oothoon as Nature in Blake’s “Visions of the Daughters of Albion”

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William Blake’s poem Visions of the Daughters of Albion presents the rape of young Oothoon and the responses to this violence from Oothoon, her love Theotormon, and her assailant Bromion. Many scholars see substantial… Continue reading

The Industrial Revolution as an Antithesis to Romantic Poetry

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The Industrial Revolution had the most significant effect on Romantic poetry because it served as a direct antithesis to the poet’s subject matter during that time. The Industrial Revolution directly correlated with the… Continue reading

The Lady of Shalott: A Poem and A Painting

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The symbol captured by the figure of The Lady of Shalott within famous works of art help to embody her as an artwork itself: a living piece of life held captive by her… Continue reading

Keats’ Consumption and the Poetry Produced

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            La Belle Dame Sans Mercy is a poem wrapped around the concept of a luring death, a coming death. This is, along with much of Keats poetry,… Continue reading

Coleridge’s Ancient Mariner and the Suspension of Disbelief

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In a narrow sense, media is a means of conveying stories, real and unreal. And in the sense of entertainment, fictional media – be it literature, television, or cinema – allows us to… Continue reading

The Serpent, the Philosopher, and the Lover: Moral Ambiguity in “Lamia”

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Romantic ideas were certainly influential in the inception of the Gothic, and many issues that the authors were passionate about quickly became thematic concepts in this new genre of Gothic poetry, such as… Continue reading

Lyrical Ballads : A Romantic Movement Towards Contemporary Poetry

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A rebellion against the Enlightenment and its emphasis on logic, politics, the church, and the like, the Romantic Movement focused on individualism, emotions, nature, and in the promotion of these concepts, broke many… Continue reading

“Into the Storm”: The Ambiguous Fate of Madeline and Porphyro in Keats’s “The Eve of St. Agnes”

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In Keats’s “The Eve of St. Agnes,” we are faced with a somewhat ambiguous ending to the “story of two adolescent lovers whose relationship is threatened by their feuding families” (Havird 91). After… Continue reading

Innocence Lost, and Innocence Regained; An Analysis of the Opinions of Blake and Wordsworth

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  The Chimney Sweeper, 2009, by Nitrouz Picture courtesy of http://nitrouzzz.deviantart.com/art/The-Chimney-Sweeper-141158929 Romantics Blake and Wordsworth both share an infatuation with innocence, and lack thereof. These poets diverge regarding the return to and departing… Continue reading

Religious Metaphor in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge, assisted by several other philosophers and writers of the time, helped to propel England into the Romantic Movement in the late eighteenth century. The movement marked England’s developmental shift out… Continue reading

Coleridge’s “Christabel” and Pyschological and Sexual Frustrations

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     Samuel Taylor Coleridge attempts a mighty handful of ambiguous themes with his work “Christabel.” In this work, ambitiously planned for seven parts yet only spanning two, Coleridge discusses unique and strange relationships… Continue reading

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