Tag Archive: samuel taylor coleridge

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

The Scarlet Albatross: The Ancient Mariner’s Own Cross To Bear

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What goes around truly does come back around, and karma tends to come back to us with a vengeance. The world has a mysterious way of making sure people’s wrong-doings are brought to… Continue reading

Evolution of the Vampire Narrative

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While Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s narrative poem “Christabel” explores Christian themes in a gothic setting, there exists a foundation of both homosexual and vampiric elements within the work as well. We see these elements… Continue reading

The Introduction of the Femme Fatale in Gothic Literature

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The femme fatale, French for “fatal women,” is a character whose importance in Romantic literature and whose journey through modern-day adaptations is almost unparalleled. Existing historically in both biblical figures as early as… Continue reading

Mental Illness in the Ancient Mariner

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” is an epic gothic poem in the romantic period that emphasizes the importance of seeing the beauty in all of God’s creatures. The poem… Continue reading

Religious Metaphor in Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner

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Samuel Taylor Coleridge, assisted by several other philosophers and writers of the time, helped to propel England into the Romantic Movement in the late eighteenth century. The movement marked England’s developmental shift out… Continue reading

Mariners and Monsters

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The frame narrative that opens Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein bears several suggestions of Coleridge’s The Rime of The Ancient Mariner, both through the setting and via some direct allusions to the poem.  The references… Continue reading

Triumph of the Serpent

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In Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem “Christabel,” the conniving and sensual Geraldine is introduced as a foil to the innocent Christabel. Throughout the poem, Christabel’s kind consideration for Geraldine and her ignorance of Geraldine’s… Continue reading

Ancient Mariners and Pirates, a Legacy

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From the opening scene of the Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl, the allusions to Coleridge’s Rime of the Ancient Mariner are rampant.  The movie contains several gothic themes… Continue reading

Coleridge’s “Christabel” and Pyschological and Sexual Frustrations

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     Samuel Taylor Coleridge attempts a mighty handful of ambiguous themes with his work “Christabel.” In this work, ambitiously planned for seven parts yet only spanning two, Coleridge discusses unique and strange relationships… Continue reading

Gothic Before Weird

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Do you enjoy the works of China Mieville? What about H.P. Lovecraft? Both of these great authors along with many more have written great stories of dark fiction. As the genre of fiction… Continue reading

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