Tag Archive: Satire

Exploring Jonathan Swift’s Motive and Attitude toward Women in “A Lady’s Dressing Room”

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The motive behind Jonathan Swift’s poem, “A Lady’s Dressing Room” has long been debated. Most interpretations, past and present, rely on the belief that Swift, himself, was a misogynist, and for good reason.… Continue reading

Goblin Market Meme

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I created this meme because one of the main themes throughout Goblin Market by Christina Rossetti was dissatisfaction. Once a girl has tasted the fruit offered by the Goblins, they can no longer hear… Continue reading

The Lady’s Dressing Room Meme

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Jonathan Swift’s “A Lady’s Dressing Room” is a satirical poem about the representation versus actuality of females in 18th century Britain. This meme explains Strephon’s confusion with the discovery of female bodily functions… Continue reading

Remembering Belinda

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This meme is in reference to “The Rape of the Lock” by Alexander Pope and used V for Vendetta to illustrate the importance and huge impact The Baron created by cutting off a… Continue reading

Mary Wollstonecraft: Guest of Honor at Galentine’s Day Dinner

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Mary Wollstonecraft should be Leslie Knope’s guest of honor at next year’s Galentine’s Day dinner. Leslie Knope needs a framed portrait of Wollstonecraft on her wall of inspirational women. If they were to… Continue reading

Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room” and the Cosmetic Conspiracy

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The Lady’s Dressing Room Jonathan Swift’s 1730 scatological poem “The Lady’s Dressing Room” details the many horrors and humors a man discovers when he decides to sneak into his lover’s room. Composed during… Continue reading

Satire: From Swift to Southpark

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A look into the similarities of satirical responses to national problems from Swift and South Park.

Robert Browning’s Blank Space

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I know. Taylor Swift’s “Blank Space” paralleled with Robert Browning’s “My Last Duchess?” Believe me, no one understands how absurd this sounds more than I do, but it works, does it not? The… Continue reading

Brutality in Satire: The Similarities of A Modest Proposal and American Psycho

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One of the biggest risks a satirist can face is his or her readers entirely missing the point of the work. Two clear instances of this have taken place decades apart from one another,… Continue reading

The Ignorance involved in Praising Aesthetics- As seen in Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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“John, you should go and play with Sally. She is pretty cute.” “Why don’t you like her? I think she is adorable.” “Sally is pretty hot man, I’d hang out with her.” “Who… Continue reading

Full Disclosure: Magnification in Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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A close reading of Jonathan Swift’s famously obscene poem “The Lady’s Dressing Room” offers several targets for the author’s satire. The focus on Celia’s vanity and deceit, compared with the forgivability of Strephon’s crimes… Continue reading

Comparing Houyhnhnms & Vulcans: How Swift’s Critique of Society is Still Used Today

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Gulliver’s Travels, anonymously published by Jonathan Swift in 1726, satirizes the travel narrative, an immensely popular genre at this time due to the vast number of explorers who published their own adventures and experiences in… Continue reading

Sharing Satire: Monty Python and Jonathan Swift Creatively Critique Their World

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    As literature for Jonathan Swift and TV/film for Monty Python became relevant, respectively, to a public audience, both, Swift from the 18th century and Monty Python, a British sketch comedy troupe famous in the 1970s and on into the 21st century, harnessed popular mediums… Continue reading

The Reason’s Why Swift May Not Be Viewed So Misogynistic

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When looking over Swift’s, The Lady’s Dressing Room, it is easy to be swept away by the contents, most pertaining to the grotesque. The shock is that the grotesque belongs to Celia, the “victim” of the… Continue reading

Swift to Judge: Satire and Culture in Gulliver’s Travels and Idiocracy

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No one can argue that Mike Judge’s mediocre comedy deserves as much criticism and examination as Swift’s literary masterpiece. Idiocracy is light entertainment with social criticism wielded as a blunt instrument as opposed… Continue reading

Swift’s Ridiculousness to Reality through a Historical Viewpoint

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  The Pope has decided to follow Swift`s advice to help out with Ireland`s economy. Through the beginning of the 18th century, English and Irish relations were in pitiful standings. Some would say that their… Continue reading

The Misogyny of Jonathan Swift & the Feminist Response of Lady Mary Montagu

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Jonathan Swift’s “The Lady’s Dressing Room,” written in 1732, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu’s direct response, “The Reasons that Induced Dr. S to Write a Poem Call’d the Lady’s Dressing Room” from 1734… Continue reading

Pope and Swift’s Satrical Shot at Society

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Johnathan Swift and Alexander Pope used there literary skills to exploit the life of the upper class in England during the early 1700’s. Although both men had small segments of seriousness and rationale;… Continue reading

Swift to Judge a Lady’s Dressing Room

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Jonathan Swift  shamelessly shows us his views about women  in his poem “A Lady’s Dressing Room.”  As such Swift has been been called misogynist throughout his satire. However I believe that while Swifts… Continue reading

Attack on the Enlightenment: Swift’s Satirical Analysis of Enlightenment Thinkers in Gulliver’s Travels

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     Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels is one of the greatest known and most effective works of satire in the 18th century. At the heart of this satirical theme was the concept of ridiculousness, specifically during… Continue reading

Privy to the Privy — Political Intimacy in the Monarch’s Dressing Room

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There is little doubt that Jonathan Swift meant to disgust his readership with the intense scatology of “The Lady’s Dressing Room.” The secrets of dear Celia’s morning routine might have traumatized the poor… Continue reading

Writing on the Stall: Swift’s Use of Bathroom Humor

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Throughout his career, Jonathan Swift consistently blurred the line between highbrow satire and lowbrow humor. A polarizing figure in English and Irish literature, Swift’s off-color writing style still finds a way to leave… Continue reading

A Swiftly Indecent Proposal

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Every person with any cultural capital at all knows or has heard of great comedy satire/parody shows like The Colbert Report and Saturday Night Live, and those people most likely don’t think about… Continue reading

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