Tag Archive: Sublime

From a Fifth Year — Tintern Abbey and The University of Arkansas

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Five years have passed; five falls, with length Of five long winters! and again I hear These bells, ringing every hour from Old Mains tower… “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,… Continue reading

Sublime Stench: Burke, Montagu, and “The Lady’s Dressing Room”

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In today’s stereotypical relationship, it is considered taboo for couples to pass gas, use the bathroom, or even vomit in front of each other. Jonathan Swift, sarcastic poet and political novelist, writes a… Continue reading

The Gothic Sublime Mystery of Twin Peaks

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This sublime scene was captured in the fictional television show, Twin Peaks. The murder of Laura Palmer haunts this small, sleepy town where the residents are full of secrets. Directors Mark Frost and David Lynch designed the show to be mysterious and disturbing, encompassing the sublime aesthetic which was described by Edmund Burke as that which “excite[s] the ideas of pain and danger… or operates in a manner analogous to terror” (37).

The Power of Nature in Romanticism: “The Rime of the Mariner” and Frankenstein

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For centuries the story of Frankenstein’s monster has been a source of entertainment and fear for people all over the world. Mary Shelley’s iconic novel has inspired songs, art, and Halloween decorations since… Continue reading

The Sublimity of Artificial Intelligence in Netflix’s “Black Mirror”

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            Edmund Burke defined the Sublime as anything that terrifies and astonishes us, particularly whatever is vast, ambiguously defined, or extremely powerful. In his view, a subjects’ ability to strike fear in the… Continue reading

Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained

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Sarah Roberts 10/25/13 Nothing Ventured Nothing Gained In reading, “Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey,” by Wordsworth, I can’t help but think of Keats and Coleridge.  Both writers wrote about a… Continue reading

Death and the Sublime in “Tintern Abbey”

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Keats famously called Wordsworth’s approach to nature and the sublime egotistical. Indeed, most Wordsworthian poems are chiefly concerned with his metacognition — memory, personal loss, and nature are filtered through Wordsworth’s self-concept. But… Continue reading

Nature as Beautiful and Sublime in Wordsworth

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The theme of many of William Wordsworth’s most famous works is a return to nature. Nature, as he describes it, has qualities both beautiful, inspiring love and passion, and sublime, inspiring terror and… Continue reading

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