Tag Archive: William Blake

Blake’s Depiction of How Innocence and Experience Are Interconnected Through “Infant Sorrow”

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William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and Experience explores the interconnection of innocence and lack thereof, known as experience. As society is known to believe, childhood is a time of innocence before understanding the… Continue reading

The Duality of Innocence and Experience in William Blake’s “The Tyger”

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As a poem, William Blake’s “The Tyger” functions much the same way that the rest of Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience does; teetering on the precipice of duality in not only… Continue reading

The Critique of Moral Law in Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience

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In William Blake’s poetry collection Songs of Innocence and of Experience, he examines the ways in which people relate and interpret the world around them. He stresses two perspectives: innocence and experience. These perspectives are… Continue reading

William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper”: Utilizing Poetry to Expose Moral and Religious Tensions

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A series of diverse, politically-charged poems, William Blake’s “Songs of Innocence” and “Songs of Experience,” evoke numerous thoughts and convictions in his audience, primarily exploring how a state of mind can influence perception… Continue reading

The Origins of Happiness: Examining the Memory of Birth in Infant Joy and Infant Sorrow

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Of the paired poems in William Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, nearly every pair seems to progress from innocence to experience. There is an inherent sense of loss about them that… Continue reading

Perspective and Perception, Everything Changes

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In this picture, two people are looking at the same thing but from different perspectives. Because they are seeing it differently, they are also perceiving it differently. (Kate.)

Beauty and The Blake: The Message Behind The Roses

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Upon reading William Blake’s “The Sick Rose,” taken from his Songs of Innocence and of Experience, a seemingly unlikely but very applicable comparison quickly came to mind. Be it the current publicized hype… Continue reading

I WISH THAT I COULD BE LIKE THE COOL KIDS: HOW THE AGE OF INNOCENCE HAS ALTERED

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Throughout William Blake’s, Songs of Innocence and Experience, he goes to great lengths on both accounts, of showing the true differences between a life of innocence, and how this is altered once experience has come… Continue reading

How Would Radical Thinker and Poet William Blake Think of Walt Disney’s Timeless Classic Mary Poppins? : Has the Image of the Chimney Sweep Changed?

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“Song of Innocence and of Experience Shewing the Two Contrary States of the Human Soul” is considered to be one of William Blake’s most popular works. Written in two parts, “Innocence and Experience… Continue reading

My Own Private Eden: Blake and Von Trier’s Efforts at a Personal Fall

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William Blake and Lars Von Trier are two artists who’ve made some strong efforts to reshape theological structures to more accurately explain human tendencies than the original stories did. In Songs of Innocence… Continue reading

Slavery: More Than Forced Labor

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Enslavement in Visions of the Daughters of Albion is depicted in William Blake’s progressive text. Oothoon, the female protagonist, is bound by society’s standpoint on purity. She is further bound when raped by… Continue reading

“The Soft Soul Of America”: Oothoon as Nature in Blake’s “Visions of the Daughters of Albion”

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William Blake’s poem Visions of the Daughters of Albion presents the rape of young Oothoon and the responses to this violence from Oothoon, her love Theotormon, and her assailant Bromion. Many scholars see substantial… Continue reading

The Industrial Revolution as an Antithesis to Romantic Poetry

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The Industrial Revolution had the most significant effect on Romantic poetry because it served as a direct antithesis to the poet’s subject matter during that time. The Industrial Revolution directly correlated with the… Continue reading

Blake and Wordsworth: Partners in the Crime of Romanticism

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Wollstonecraft in Visions of the Daughters of Albion

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There are some scholars who believe that Oothoon from Blake’s poem Visions of the Daughters of Albion is based on writer Mary Wollstonecraft. Wollstonecraft and Blake spent time together during weekly meetings of… Continue reading

William Blake’s Oothoon: Feminist or Fool?

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William Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion was written a year after Mary Wollstonecraft’s A Vindication of the Rights of Women, a detailed article pushing for women’s education while critiquing the male… Continue reading

The French Revolution as it can be Read in Visions of the Daughters of Albion

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The French Revolution as it can be Read in Visions of the Daughters of Albion William Blake’s Visions of the Daughters of Albion is saturated with symbolism and ideological proclamations, one of them… Continue reading

Eccentrics of Blake

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          While poetry covers an array of topics one author stands alone, William Blake. He wrote about many different things during his life. Blake was known well in some circles during his life,… Continue reading

William Blake, Chimney Sweeping the Church.

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   William Blake throughout his life was a man of religious beliefs. However being reverent of the Bible he was hostile to the Church of England and to all forms of organized religion.… Continue reading

Innocence and Hypocrisy: Just Another Day at Church

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Though William Blake was a religious man who believed he experienced visions throughout his life, he was not averse to critiquing the “social evils” he perceived within the church (Damrosch 171).  In two… Continue reading

The Tyger and the Mentalist

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When a work survives the ages and becomes an often recited and much studied piece of literature, it is taken and used in many different ways than originally intended. It could have the… Continue reading

Not Ceasing From Mental Fight — William Blake’s Mystic Vision

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William Blake’s strange collection of poetry and polemic is a striking juxtaposition of form and function. Many of his poems, seen on their own, appear much like the didactic and socially-minded religious pop-poetry… Continue reading

Soot -Oh, Sweep

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When one thinks of a Chimney Sweeper, the first image to come to mind is the romanticized character of Bert the Chimney Sweep from Mary Poppins, the happy-go-lucky figure who always had a… Continue reading

Nature as Beautiful and Sublime in Wordsworth

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The theme of many of William Wordsworth’s most famous works is a return to nature. Nature, as he describes it, has qualities both beautiful, inspiring love and passion, and sublime, inspiring terror and… Continue reading

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